Periodontitis

Roman-Britons had less gum disease than modern Britons

The Roman-British population from c. 200-400 AD appears to have had far less gum disease than we have today, according to a study of skulls at the Natural History Museum led by a King's College London periodontist. The surprise ...

Oct 23, 2014
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Combatting periodontal pathogens

A total 12 million Germans suffer from periodontitis. If the inflammation remains untreated, this could lead to tooth loss. However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary ...

Oct 01, 2014
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Accommodating LGBT patients in dental, medical offices

As the pediatric dentist walked her 4-year-old patient back to the waiting room, she inquired, "Is your mommy or daddy here?" The child, who had two mommies, burst into tears. The dentist, a lesbian, felt ...

Sep 08, 2014
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Dental woes of an aging population

Public health dentist Mark Nehring remembers attending a lecture on geriatric treatment 20 years ago. The speaker offered up slides of a patient with ample evidence of previous dental care: "crowns in place, very good fillings," ...

Aug 13, 2014
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Periodontitis or pyorrhea is a set of inflammatory diseases affecting the periodontium, i.e., the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis involves progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can lead to the loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is caused by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, along with an overly aggressive immune response against these microorganisms. A diagnosis of periodontitis is established by inspecting the soft gum tissues around the teeth with a probe (i.e. a clinical exam) and by evaluating the patient's x-ray films (i.e. a radiographic exam), to determine the amount of bone loss around the teeth. Specialists in the treatment of periodontitis are periodontists; their field is known as "periodontology" or "periodontics".

The word "periodontitis" comes from peri ("around"), odont ("tooth") and -itis ("inflammation").

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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