Prostate Cancer

How prostate cancer cells evolve

(Medical Xpress)—UCLA researchers have discovered how prostate cancer stem cells evolve as the disease progresses, a finding that could help point the way to more highly targeted therapies. 

Dec 04, 2013
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Protein in prostate biopsies signals increased cancer risk

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have shown that the presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ. The discovery ...

Dec 03, 2013
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In prostate cancer prognosis, telomere length may matter

Like the plastic caps at the end of shoelaces, telomeres protect—in their case—the interior-gene containing parts of chromosomes that carry a cell's instructional material. Cancer cells are known to have short telomeres, ...

Sep 26, 2013
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Cancer cells propagated from early prostate cancer

A team of cancer researchers at the University of California, San Diego has identified the existence of precursor cells in early prostate cancers. These cells are resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy, and may drive the ...

Sep 25, 2013
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Latest Spotlight News

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

Study says we're over the hill at 24

(Medical Xpress)—It's a hard pill to swallow, but if you're over 24 years of age you've already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new Simon Fraser University study.