Expert: Surgical gel has injured women

February 11, 2008

A leading gynecologist in New Zealand alleges Confluent SprayGel has caused internal scarring in several women who used the surgical gel.

Specialist Hanifa Koya said the new gel, which contains a drug that was never tested on humans, has caused painful internal scarring in dozens of women to date, The Dominion Post reported in its Monday edition.

Koya said these women now suffer from endometriosis, a medical condition in which abnormal growths appear in a woman's pelvic organs. These growths typically lead to painful inflammations, which in turn cause internal scarring and occasionally infertility.

The gynecologist said most doctors have already stopped using the potentially harmful gel, but warned some medical officials still implement the treatment.

Koya told the Post she contacted Medsafe, New Zealand's federal agency for medicine approval, but little to no action was taken to prevent the gel from being used.

"It's quite amazing -- we're using it inside human beings," she said. "I would have expected ... that they would have said, `Let's put this product on hold or start asking some questions,' but that didn't happen."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: A material to rejuvenate aging and diseased human vocal cords

Related Stories

Slug glue: A future with no sutures?

August 14, 2013

The materials for stitching up injuries and surgical wounds may have changed over the millennia, but the basic process of suturing tissue remains the same. In the 21st century, however, the method may finally become outdated.

New tissue engineering breakthrough encourages nerve repair

July 8, 2013

A new combination of tissue engineering techniques could reduce the need for nerve grafts, according to new research by The Open University. Regeneration of nerves is challenging when the damaged area is extensive, and surgeons ...

More patients getting lab-grown body parts

June 17, 2013

By the time 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan finally got a lung transplant last week, she'd been waiting for months, and her parents had sued to give her a better chance at surgery. Her cystic fibrosis was threatening her life, ...

Recommended for you

Study shows blood products unaffected by drone trips

December 7, 2016

In what is believed to be the first proof-of-concept study of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers have determined that large bags of blood products, such as those transfused into patients every day, can maintain temperature ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.