World's most advanced genetic map created

by David Cameron

A consortium led by scientists at the University of Oxford and Harvard Medical School has constructed the world's most detailed genetic map.

A genetic map specifies the precise areas in the of a sperm or egg where the DNA from the mother and father has been reshuffled in order to produce this single reproductive cell. The whereby this reshuffling occurs is known as "recombination." While almost every genetic map built so far has been developed from people of , this new map is the first constructed from African American recombination genomic data.

"This is the world's most accurate genetic map," said David Reich, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, who co-led the study with Simon Myers, a lecturer in the Department of Statistics at the University of Oxford.

The researchers were surprised to find that positions where recombination occurs in African Americans are significantly different from non-African populations.

"The landscape of recombination has shifted in African Americans compared with Europeans," said Anjali Hinch, first author and a post-graduate student at Oxford University's Wellcome Trust Centre for .

Simon Myers added, "More than half of African Americans carry a version of the biological machinery for recombination that is different than Europeans. As a result, African Americans experience recombination where it almost never occurs in Europeans."

The findings will be published in the July 21 edition of Nature.

An independent study that used a similar strategy to build a genetic map in African Americans—led by University of California, Los Angeles, scientists Daniel Wegmann, Nelson Freimer and John Novembre—will be published in Nature Genetics.

Scientists have only recently begun to explore the genetic differences between individuals and populations — and the role those differences play in human health. In that respect, the first draft of the human genome, completed a decade ago, was only a starting point for understanding the genetic origins of disease.

As researchers begin to parse those differences, a crucial tool is a , which in this case was based on where recombination has occurred across the genome. Recombination, together with mutation, accounts for all the genetic (and thus physical) variety we see within species. But while mutation refers to the errors introduced into single locations within genomes when cells divide, recombination refers to the process by which huge chunks of chromosomes are stitched together during sexual reproduction.

But this stitching process only occurs at specific locations. In a prior landmark set of papers, Myers and his colleagues identified a DNA code, or motif, that attracted part of the recombination machinery, a gene called PRDM9. Knowing the motif, a string of 13 DNA letters, researchers could zero in on the locations where recombination typically occurred—the "recombination hotspots."

"When recombination goes wrong, it can lead to mutations causing congenital diseases, for example diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, or certain anemias," said Myers. "We found the same 13 base motif marking many of these disease mutation sites."

Explained Reich, "The places in the genome where there are recombination hotspots can thus also be disease hotspots. Charting recombination hotspots can thus identify places in the genome that have an especially high chance of causing disease."

The researchers discovered that the 13 base-pair motif that is responsible for many of the hotspots in accounts for only two thirds as much recombination in African Americans. They connected the remaining third to a new motif of 17 base pairs, which is recognized by a version of the recombinational machinery that occurs almost exclusively in people of African ancestry.

These findings are expected to help researchers understand the roots of congenital conditions that occur more often in African Americans (due to mutations at hotspots that are more common in African Americans), and also to help discover new disease genes in all populations, because of the ability to map these genes more precisely.

The new map is so accurate because African American individuals often have a mixture of African and European ancestry from over the last two hundred years. David Reich and Simon Myers are experts in analyzing genetic data to reconstruct the mosaic of regions of African and European genetic ancestry in DNA of . By applying a computer program they previously wrote, Anjali Hinch identified the places in the genomes where the African and European ancestry switches in almost 30,000 people, detecting about 70 switches per person. These areas corresponded to recombination events in the last few hundred years. Thus, the researchers identified more than two million recombination events that they used to build the map.

The study was only possible because of collaboration from 81 co-authors, using DNA samples from five large studies that have been carried out to study common diseases such as heart disease and cancer, funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, and many private foundations.

Said James Wilson, a professor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center who was responsible for coordinating the collaboration, "All the co-authors worked together in an incredibly collegial way to put together the enormous set of samples and high quality genetic data that made this study a success."

More information: The recombination map is available at www.well.ox.ac.uk/~anjali/AAmap/

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2020
1 / 5 (1) Jul 20, 2011
"As researchers begin to parse those differences, a crucial tool is a genetic map, which in this case was based on where recombination has occurred across the genome. Recombination, together with mutation, accounts for all the genetic (and thus physical) variety we see within species. But while mutation refers to the errors introduced into single locations within genomes when cells divide, recombination refers to the process by which huge chunks of chromosomes are stitched together during sexual reproduction."
Commonly, so many speak of evolution as D child of 'mutation', but mutation that could effect change on D same scale of recombination would render life & its continuation A LOTTERY WIN. There would only B a handful of creatures on the entire planet 4 a single or a few life times. Even worse, there R not ENOUGH mutations occurring 2 support the vaguest concept of evolution:http://medicalxpr...tic.html
word-to-ya-muthas
FrankHerbert
1.6 / 5 (7) Jul 20, 2011
Mutations are random but natural selection isn't. The mutations available to a species are random, but the genome isn't. The environment pressures a species to find out what works. It does or it dies.

The article you posted is specifically talking about humans, highly advanced, multicellular, sexual creatures. We are full of all sorts of adaptations that stabilize our genome. For something as complicated as us (or other higher order animals) mutations can pretty easily throw a wrench into the works. That isn't to say that we don't evolve, just very slowly.

Look at more simple forms of life. They are much more capable of dealing with mutations (and deal with MUCH higher rates of mutation which do support evolution) as there is less complication and the mutation runs a much higher chance of being beneficial or neutral.

More complicated creatures will evolve more slowly because they are more complicated and easier to screw up.

Einstein had an abnormal brain. Beneficial adaption?
2020
1 / 5 (1) Jul 20, 2011
Indeed: "Look at more simple forms of life. They are much more capable of dealing with mutations (and deal with MUCH higher rates of mutation which do support evolution) as there is less complication and the mutation runs a much higher chance of being beneficial or neutral."

I once thought as you do. Then we discovered that..."Of all the animals genome sequenced to date, the tiny water flea has the highest number of genes, more than mice, roundworms, yeast, bacteria and humans." Big OOOPSY there! The water flea is almost invisible to the naked eye but the part of it and us that is subject to evolutionary trigger is BIGGER than ours. Hence, we Can/could evolve faster than the simplest of creatures but something else is in control other than raw mutation. If we have 60, PROVEN 60, mutations per life-start and not the greatest number of genes, we cannot rationalize smaller number or greater number of mutations for smaller creatures! Something else is also involved as a trigger.
word-

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