Better chronic pain management

August 15, 2011

Pain care management needs to be improved, with health care professionals committing to improve care as well as a retooling of the health care system to help people who are suffering, states an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

According to a recent analysis, chronic pain affects people of all ages, with an estimated 500,000 Canadians aged 12 to 44 years, 38% of seniors in long-term care institutions and 27% of seniors living at home experiencing regular pain.

"Experts agree that much can be done now with newer analgesics, nonpharmacologic techniques such as and physical therapies, as well as spiritual and supportive care," write Drs. Noni MacDonald, Ken Flegel, Paul Hébert and Matthew Stanbrook. "Availability of quality care for pain is the major problem. Health professionals have not mounted a response commensurate with the magnitude of the problem."

The authors argue for a broad strategy to help increase pain management expertise, including education, technology, and supported self-care and lay coaching.

Explore further: Quality health care delivery key election issue, says CMAJ

Related Stories

Quality health care delivery key election issue, says CMAJ

April 6, 2011

Delivering quality health care rather than health care sustainability is a key issue for Canada's federal election, and Canadians need a vision from federal leaders to radically transform our health care system, states an ...

Sleep deprivation in doctors

May 24, 2011

Sleep deprivation is an issue that affects practising physicians and not only medical residents, and we need to establish standards for maximum work and minimum uninterrupted sleep to ensure patient safety, states an editorial ...

Recommended for you

Older people getting smarter, but not fitter

August 31, 2015

Older populations are scoring better on cognitive tests than people of the same age did in the past —a trend that could be linked to higher education rates and increased use of technology in our daily lives, say IIASA population ...

Higher intelligence score means better physical performance

August 14, 2015

New research reveals a distinct association between male intelligence in early adulthood and their subsequent midlife physical performance. The higher intelligence score, the better physical performance, the study reveals. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.