Lawson scientist presents joint pain treatment 2.0

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting roughly 10% of Canadians. This degradation of the joints is painful and crippling, especially when it affects the knee. Although there are viable OA treatment options, they are short-lived and can have serious side-effects. According to Lawson Health Research Institute's Dr. Robert Petrella, principal investigator in the COR1.0 study, the next generation of OA treatment has arrived.

When patients have OA in the knee, the fluid in their joint breaks down, causing pain and preventing natural shock absorption. To treat this condition, gel-like substances called "viscosupplements" are injected into the knee. This acts as a supplement for the fluid loss and provides temporary . In the COR1.0 study, Dr. Petrella and his colleagues compared Synvisc-One, the leading market viscosupplement for OA in the knee, to Hydros-TA Joint Therapy. Hydros-TA is a unique dual-action treatment combining within a viscosupplement. It is believed to provide faster acting, longer lasting pain relief than either treatment alone.

To compare and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of both treatments, Dr. Petrella and his team conducted a double-blinded, multi-center clinical trial. Across eight sites in Canada, Belgium, and The Netherlands, a total of 98 patients were given a single injection and then monitored for six months. Results show trends suggesting Hydros-TA provides superior pain relief and improved function, causes fewer , and has a higher overall response rate. For patients, this could mean greater, more consistent pain relief with faster onset.

"Patients are really searching for better options for therapy," Dr. Petrella explains. "Hydros-TA takes effect very quickly and lasts longer than other available therapies, allowing patients to achieve and sustain a higher quality of life."

Dr. Petrella and Carbylan BioSurgery Inc., the makers of Hydros-TA, are planning a larger multi-center trial to take place in the United States next year.

Provided by Lawson Health Research Institute

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