FRAX calculator issued in version 3.4

September 21, 2011

FRAX®, the widely used online fracture risk assessment calculator hosted at the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield (http://www.shef.ac.uk/FRAX), has now been released in version 3.4. With 18 languages, 38 models, and availability as a desktop option, FRAX is becoming increasingly accessible to clinicians around the world.

New – FRAX Desktop:

FRAX is now available for use without internet. Subscriptions are available for individual or multi-patient entry versions. The application can be downloaded at http://www.who-frax.org/

Now in 18 languages with the addition of Italian and Romanian:

FRAX is available in 18 languages: English, Arabic, Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, Czech, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish

Thirty-eight specific models:

FRAX has been integrated in many national osteoporosis guidelines, including those of the USA, Canada and the UK. The is available in 38 models for the following countries/regions/territories around the world:

  • Asia: China, Hong Kong China, Japan, Philippines, S. Korea, Singapore, Chinese Taipei
  • Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Malta, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK
  • Latin America: Argentina, Colombia, Mexico
  • Middle-East & Africa: Jordan, Lebanon, Tunisia
  • North America: Canada, USA (in 4 models)
  • Oceania: Australia, New Zealand
Use of the online FRAX® tool at http://www.shef.ac.uk/FRAX/ is free of charge. Offline versions are available as an iPhone Application or as FRAX® Desktop download. In addition, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) hosts teaching resources and downloadable questionnaires on its website at www.iofbonehealth.org

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