FRAX calculator issued in version 3.4

September 21, 2011

FRAX®, the widely used online fracture risk assessment calculator hosted at the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield (, has now been released in version 3.4. With 18 languages, 38 models, and availability as a desktop option, FRAX is becoming increasingly accessible to clinicians around the world.

New – FRAX Desktop:

FRAX is now available for use without internet. Subscriptions are available for individual or multi-patient entry versions. The application can be downloaded at

Now in 18 languages with the addition of Italian and Romanian:

FRAX is available in 18 languages: English, Arabic, Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, Czech, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish

Thirty-eight specific models:

FRAX has been integrated in many national osteoporosis guidelines, including those of the USA, Canada and the UK. The is available in 38 models for the following countries/regions/territories around the world:

  • Asia: China, Hong Kong China, Japan, Philippines, S. Korea, Singapore, Chinese Taipei
  • Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Malta, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, UK
  • Latin America: Argentina, Colombia, Mexico
  • Middle-East & Africa: Jordan, Lebanon, Tunisia
  • North America: Canada, USA (in 4 models)
  • Oceania: Australia, New Zealand
Use of the online FRAX® tool at is free of charge. Offline versions are available as an iPhone Application or as FRAX® Desktop download. In addition, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) hosts teaching resources and downloadable questionnaires on its website at

Explore further: Fracture prediction methods may be useful for patients with diabetes

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