Goats could increase the risk of a rare lung cancer

Exposure to goats could increase the risk of a certain type of lung cancer, according to French researchers.

The study, which will be presented at the European Respiratory Society's Annual Congress in Amsterdam today (25 September 2011), has linked a professional exposure to goats with a distinct subset of , known as pneumonic-type (P-ADC).

This form of lung cancer has a weak association with when compared with other types of the disease. In attempting to identify other triggers that may cause the disease, scientists have previously noticed similarities between P-ADC and a viral infection which causes growths in the lungs of sheep. Given these similarities, the researchers have investigated whether a viral agent found in sheep and goats could be easily transferred to people who work with the animals, leading to a partiality for P-ADC.

The current epidemiologic study involved 44 patients with P-ADC and 132 controls without the disease. All participants were given a questionnaire assessing a number of risk factors including their smoking status, their personal history of cancer and their exposure to goats.

The results showed that people who had experienced a professional exposure to goats during their lifetime were five times more likely to get P-ADC compared with other types of lung cancer.

The findings also showed that P-ADC was significantly associated with females, and people who had never smoked or had any personal history of cancer.

Dr Nicolas Girard, from the Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, said: "Scientists have noticed similarities between P-ADC and a contagious viral infection in sheep before. This led us to explore the possibility that professional exposure to cattle could make humans more susceptible to P-ADC. These findings demonstrate that exposure to could be a risk factor for this type of lung cancer, however further studies are needed to assess other potential for the disease."

Provided by European Lung Foundation

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Research links diet, gardening and lung cancer risk

Dec 07, 2007

By simply eating four or more servings of green salad a week and working in the garden once or twice a week, smokers and nonsmokers alike may be able to substantially reduce the risk of developing lung cancer, say researchers ...

Lung cancer risk rises in the presence of HPV antibodies

Apr 04, 2011

Researchers with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have found that people with lung cancer were significantly more likely to have several high-risk forms of human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies compared ...

Some vitamin supplements don't protect against lung cancer

May 21, 2007

A study of more than 75,000 adults found that taking supplemental multivitamins, vitamin C and E and folate do not decrease the risk of lung cancer. The findings are being reported at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International ...

Recommended for you

How 'wriggling' skin cancer cells go on the move

19 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists at King's College London have discovered a new way that melanoma skin cancer cells can invade healthy tissue and spread round the body, according to research published in Nature Co ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dogbert
1 / 5 (1) Sep 25, 2011
Interesting. Scary.

If people get this cancer from a virus carried by sheep and goats, the obvious question is "Can people infected with this virus infect other people?"

The article should have named the virus in question.