Incidences and severity of prostate cancer correlated with meat consumption: study

Increased consumption of ground beef or processed meat is positively associated with aggressive prostate cancer, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the online journal PLoS ONE.

The research team, led by John Witte of University of California, San Francisco, also found that the correlation was primarily driven by red meat that was grilled or barbequed, especially when well done.

They suggest that this result, which was determined based on the meat consumption habits of about 1,000 male participants, is due to increased levels of carcinogens in meat prepared these ways. The report furthers previous findings of the correlation between and prostate cancer, and may help determine particular compounds that could be targeted for .

More information: Punnen S, Hardin J, Cheng I, Klein EA, Witte JS (2011) Impact of Meat Consumption, Preparation, and Mutagens on Aggressive Prostate Cancer. PLoS ONE 6(11): e27711. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027711

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