Chilean twins in delicate condition post-surgery

In this image taken from a video released by Luis Calvo Mackenna hospital, Roberto Paredes, right, kisses his daughter Maria Jose, one of two conjoined twins after she was separated from her sister Maria Paz at the Luis Calvo Mackenna hospital in Santiago, Chile, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011. The 10-months-old twins were joined at the chest, stomach and pelvis. (AP Photo/Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital)

(AP) -- Conjoined twin girls who were separated in a 20-hour operation were in critical condition on Friday and one was in danger of dying, according to the director of the Chilean hospital where they are being treated.

Doctors have been closely watching the 10-month-old twins for any complications since Tuesday's operation and Hospital director Osvaldo Artaza said that Maria Jose suffered "an episode of cardiac complications that required reanimation and extraordinary measures."

"That means that Maria Jose ... has a certain risk of dying," he said.

Surgeon Francisco ossandon performed a follow-up operation on both girls on Friday to change meshing that had been used to cover part of the twins' after the surgery at the Luis Calvo Mackenna hospital in Santiago, Chile's capital.

Doctors had said from the start that the most dangerous period for complications would arise 48 to 72 hours after the complex operation that ended early Wednesday. It was the seventh that the two girls had undergone since their birth at a hospital in Villarrica, about 470 miles (760 kilometers) south of Santiago.

The twins presented a particularly difficult challenge because they were born sharing many and even urinary system. About 100 people participated in the separation procedure, including 25 surgeons and .

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, roughly one out of every 200,000 worldwide results in conjoined twins. The overall survival rate is between 5 percent to 25 percent, depending on various factors, including where they are joined.

Earlier this year, doctors separated the twins' legs, urinary tracts, pulmonary systems and other parts of their bodies. They now each have part of a leg that used to be fused together. During the latest surgery, doctors separated an intestine that had been shared by the two.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Chilean doctors separate conjoined twins

Dec 14, 2011

Chilean doctors successfully separated conjoined twin girls early Wednesday after a marathon 18-hour surgery widely followed in the South American country on television and the Internet.

Chilean doctors begin operation on Siamese twins

Dec 13, 2011

A Chilean medical team Tuesday began an operation to separate 10-month-old Siamese twin girls joined at the chest and pelvis in one of the most complex procedures ever in the South American nation.

Separated Philippine twins doing well after US op

Nov 03, 2011

A pair of 2-year-old formerly conjoined twin girls from the Philippines are recovering well after an operation to separate them in California, a hospital spokeswoman said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

New MCAT shifts focus, will include humanities

5 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) has been revised, and the latest changes, including more humanities such as social sciences, are due to be implemented next April, according to a report ...

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

16 hours ago

Decades of feminist research have framed rape and sexual assault as a 'women's issue', leaving little room for the experiences of male victims. But a new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies suggests that feminist ...

Simulation-based training improves endoscopy execution

Oct 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—Simulation-based training (SBT) improves clinicians' performance of gastrointestinal endoscopy in both test settings and clinical practice, according to research published in the October issue ...

User comments