Football could contribute to strokes in adolescents

Young football players may be at higher risk for stroke, according to a new study released in Journal of Child Neurology (JCN).

Researchers Dr. Jared R. Brosch and Dr. Meredith R. Golomb looked at various case studies of football players in their teens that suffered a stroke and found some potential causes for strokes in young football athletes. Some of those potential risks include:

The authors point out the increase in obesity presents a two-fold risk as it not only increases the force of impacts among the players, but also the likelihood for other such as hypertension.

"Two of our subjects had mild hypertension, but were too young to have had the many years of exposure that would lead to chronic vascular injury," wrote the researchers.

Looking at the previous research, the authors did conclude that even more investigation was needed to better draw conclusions and best practices for dealing with and football in children.

"Organized childhood tackle football in the United States can begin at age 5 years, leading to potentially decades of repeated brain injuries. In addition, the of the United States pediatric football-playing population continues to increase, so the forces experienced by tackled pediatric players continues to increase," wrote Brosch and Golomb. "Further work is needed to understand how repeated high-impact large-force trauma from childhood football affects the immature central nervous system."

More information: "American Childhood Football as a Possible Risk Factor for Cerebral Infarction," in Journal of Child Neurology is available at jcn.sagepub.com/content/26/12/1493.full.pdf+html

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study asks how safe is high school football?

Aug 15, 2007

Football, one of the most popular sports in the United States, is also the leading cause of sports-related injuries. During the 2005-06 season, high school football players sustained more than half a million ...

Recommended for you

Energy drinks cause insomnia and nervousness in athletes

56 minutes ago

A study analysing the positive and negative effects of energy drinks on athletes has seen that, although in principle their sports performance was seen to improve by between 3% and 7%, there was also an increase ...

Young Aussie women now fatter but fitter

2 hours ago

Young Australian women are fatter, fitter and more frazzled today than they were nearly 20 years ago, according to Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health researchers.

Healthy relationships help foster healthy eating habits

3 hours ago

There are few subjects more personal than an individual's weight. And for those people who are considered overweight, whether this is a scientifically accurate measurement or a personal assessment, the battle ...

User comments