Radical surgery saves life of young mom

A team led by Dr. Alan Hemming, transplant surgeon at UC San Diego Health System, has successfully performed the West Coast's first ex-vivo liver resection, a radical procedure to completely remove and reconstruct a diseased liver and re-implant it without any tumors. The procedure saved the life of a 27-year-old mother whose liver had been invaded by a painful tumor that crushed the organ and entangled its blood supply.

"During a nine-hour surgery the team was able to remove the basketball-sized tumor," said Hemming, professor and surgical director of the Center for Hepatobiliary Disease and Abdominal Transplantation (CHAT) at UC San Diego . "This is a surgery that carries a 15 to 20 percent risk of mortality. In this case, the patient would not have survived if she did not have surgery. This was the only way we could save her liver and her life."

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

During the procedure, the diseased liver was detached from the body, flushed with preservation solution and cooled to a temperature of 4 degrees Celsius. This allowed Hemming to carefully remove the tumor from the liver in a bloodless field while preserving vital structures. Hemming then removed the tumor which weighed as much as the liver itself. Once the tumor was removed, the vessels were meticulously reconstructed. The liver was then successfully reimplanted.

"It was amazing to learn the tumor was so big and growing inside me," said Clerisa Keirsey, mother of three and Oceanside resident. "I am glad Dr. Hemming was here to perform the surgery and happy to be going home to be with my children."

Hemming specializes in all forms of liver surgery including split, living-related, and domino transplant procedures and has performed more than 700 and 900 liver resections. He performs all aspects of hepatobiliary surgery including both open and laparoscopic liver resection for tumors, resection of the pancreas and , and portal decompressive procedures.

Provided by University of California

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Jobs said little about pancreatic cancer struggle

Oct 06, 2011

(AP) -- Steve Jobs managed to live more than seven years with a rare form of pancreatic cancer that grows more slowly than the common kind. But his need for a liver transplant two years ago was a bad sign ...

Surgeons Use Microwaves to Destroy Tumors

Feb 03, 2009

A new minimally-invasive option for treating liver tumors, called microwave ablation, is now available at UC San Diego Medical Center and Moores UCSD Cancer Center, the only hospitals in the region to offer ...

Rare 'domino' transplant preformed

Oct 03, 2006

U.S. transplant surgeons have performed a "domino" transplant procedure to save two patients suffering a life-threatening liver condition.

Recommended for you

Factors ID'd that influence lack of orthopedic follow-up

Oct 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—For patients treated in the emergency department, orthopedic-related and demographic variables influence failure to return for outpatient management ("no-show"), according to a study published ...

Surgery may not fix long-term palsy of spine disease

Oct 17, 2014

(HealthDay)—Duration of palsy should be considered when selecting candidates for surgical management of painless foot drop in patients with degenerative lumbar disorders, according to research published ...

User comments