Shorter hospital stay for knee replacement linked with greater revision, mortality risks

February 9, 2012

No previous research has quantified and compared the costs and outcomes between total knee replacement (TKR) patients who have differing lengths of hospital stay following surgery.

In new research presented today at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), investigators identified who had undergone TKR between 1997 and 2009. The patients were separated into the following groups: outpatient, 1-day inpatient, 2-day inpatient, 3- or 4-day inpatient (standard of care), and 5 plus day inpatient. Investigators reviewed outcomes for the including annual payments, mortality, readmission, revision and common complications.

After adjusting for various factors, the results were compared at 90 days, one year, and two years after surgery. Compared to patients who had the standard of care 3-4 day hospital stay, the incremental payments for costs at 2 years were - $6,964 (lower) for the outpatient group, - $3,327 for patients hospitalized for one day, -$1,681 for two days, and +$1,159 for five plus days. At 90 days, the outpatient group had less pain and stiffness compared to the standard care (3-4 day) group, but had a higher risk for mortality, readmission and dislocation.

Investigators recommend that hospitals that choose to implement shorter stay protocols for TKR patients, do so gradually and only with appropriate and sufficient capabilities.

Explore further: Outpatient treatment proves safe, effective for low-risk patients with pulmonary embolism

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Team finds gene that confirms existence of psoriatic arthritis

February 5, 2015

PsA is a common form of inflammatory form of arthritis causing pain and stiffness in joints and tendons that can lead to joint damage. Nearly all patients with PsA also have skin psoriasis and, in many cases, the skin disease ...

Blocking one receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis

September 10, 2014

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis—and that activation ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.