Skin experts call for assessment of new nickel-plated coins

April 20, 2012

In a letter published today on bmj.com, authors from St John's Institute of Dermatology and the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield look at The Treasury's plans to introduce Royal Mint nickel-plated coins.

The authors say that there has been no assessment of the new coinage which is being brought in to save costs. Furthermore, there has been no consideration (by HM Treasury officials or the Royal Mint) given to the potential costs to health in terms of , financial implications to the NHS or other costs to the taxpayer.

The Royal Mint has in fact confirmed that they have "no information on nickel-release from the new coins" and that no studies or assessments have been undertaken on how it may affect those with a nickel allergy.

In comparison, The Treasury's Swedish counterparts, Swedish Riksbank have recently concluded that nickel-plated coins "pose unacceptable risks to health" and they will "not be using nickel containing in their coinage".

The Royal Mint may have followed all the rules with regards to the introduction of new coinage, but there is still no proof that those with hand () or nickel contact allergies will not suffer.

The authors suggest that Sir John Beddington, Chief Scientific Adviser to HM Government, gives his opinion on the matter. The letter ends with the last thought that public records should show that "competent risk assessment has formally considered the concerns".

Explore further: High bodily levels of nickel and selenium may lower pancreatic cancer risk

More information: www.bmj.com

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Molecular Zika study finds possible target for tests, drugs

April 19, 2016

The molecular structure of the Zika virus as seen on x-ray crystallography revealed electrostatic differences in a key protein compared with other flaviviruses that might explain how it infects human cells, according to a ...

Zika virus may now be tied to another brain disease

April 10, 2016

The Zika virus may be associated with an autoimmune disorder that attacks the brain's myelin similar to multiple sclerosis, according to a small study that is being released today and will be presented at the American Academy ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.