Link between vascular disease and disc height loss examined

June 8, 2012
Link between vascular disease and disc height loss examined
The association between vascular disease, as measured by abdominal aortic calcifications, and disc height loss is independent of cardiovascular disease and is largely explained by patient age, gender, and body mass index, according to a study published in the April issue of The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay) -- The association between vascular disease, as measured by abdominal aortic calcifications (AACs), and disc height loss is independent of cardiovascular disease and is largely explained by patient age, gender, and body mass index (BMI), according to a study published in the April issue of The Spine Journal.

Pradeep Suri, M.D., of the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional, community-based study utilizing a sample of 435 participants from the . Quantitative AAC scores, measured using computed tomography scans, were grouped as tertiles of no (reference), low, and high calcification, and the association with disc height loss was assessed.

In crude analyses, the researchers found that, compared with no calcification, low AAC and high AAC were significantly associated with disc height loss (odds ratio [OR], 2.05 and 2.24, respectively). The relationship between AAC and disc height loss was not attenuated by hypertension, smoking, diabetes, or hypercholesterolemia. However, after adjustment for patient age, sex, and BMI, there was an attenuation in the associations between low AAC (OR, 1.20; P = 0.51) and high AAC (OR, 0.74; P = 0.42) and disc height loss.

"AAC was associated with disc height loss in this community-based population," the authors write. "This relationship was independent of . However, the association of AAC with disc height loss was explained by the effects of age, sex, and BMI."

Several authors disclosed to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Explore further: Overweight children may develop back pain and spinal abnormalities

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Pattern of disc degeneration impacts low back pain

April 12, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Contiguous, multilevel disc degeneration (CMDD) is associated with increased likelihood of low back pain (LBP) and pain severity compared with skipped level disc degeneration (SLDD), according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Team discovers how Zika virus causes fetal brain damage

August 24, 2016

Infection by the Zika virus diverts a key protein necessary for neural cell division in the developing human fetus, thereby causing the birth defect microcephaly, a team of Yale scientists reported Aug. 24 in the journal ...

Zika infection may affect adult brain cells

August 18, 2016

Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and ...

Immune breakthrough: Unscratching poison ivy's rash

August 23, 2016

We all know that a brush with poison ivy leaves us with an itchy painful rash. Now, Monash University and Harvard researchers have discovered the molecular cause of this irritation. The finding brings us a step closer to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.