Canada's provinces plan to pool drug purchases

The leaders of Canada's 13 provinces and territories unveiled a plan Thursday to pool their purchases of generic drugs to gain a bulk discount amid concern over soaring healthcare costs.

The premiers are meeting this week in Halifax to discuss pan-Canadian issues such as soaring healthcare and linking up the nation's fractured .

They released a report at the summit that calls for bulk drug purchases starting as early as September, but it did not outline what the expected savings would be.

Previous attempts by the provinces to cooperate on healthcare, however, have failed.

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