Cognitive behavioral therapy helps nurses manage stress

Cognitive behavioral therapy helps nurses manage stress
A once-weekly cognitive behavioral intervention significantly reduces nurses' occupational stress and fatigue and increases vigor, according to research published in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

(HealthDay) -- A once-weekly cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) significantly reduces nurses' occupational stress and fatigue and increases vigor, according to research published in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Sarid Orly, Ph.D., of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer-Sheva, Israel, and colleagues conducted a study involving 20 who participated in a CBI course and 16 control nurses matched by age, education, marital status, and hospital department. The authors sought to evaluate the impact of CBI on nurses' occupational stress and overall well-being, specifically their sense of (SOC), perceived stress (PSS), and mood states.

The researchers found that the 64-hour course, conducted in four-hour increments once per week, yielded significant increases in participants' SOC and vigor when compared with that of control nurses who did not participate in the CBI. PSS and fatigue were also significantly reduced.

"The present study investigated the effects of CBI group intervention upon nurses' perceived SOC, PSS, and mood states in comparison with a ," the authors write. "Results showed that only nurses who had participated in the CBI course had higher SOC, more vigor, less PSS, and less fatigue upon completion of the study."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Occupational exposures put nurses at risk of miscarriage

Apr 11, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Nurses face an increased risk of spontaneous abortions during early pregnancy from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs and sterilizing agents, according to a study published in the ...

Calling nurses to exercise as role models for their patients

Aug 30, 2011

Nurses, just like many of their patients, struggle to find time and motivation to exercise. But a new study may give these all-important caregivers some additional pressure and responsibility: nurses' attitudes can influence ...

Bullying threatens nurses' health and careers

Mar 20, 2008

In workplaces where nurses are bullied, the quality of patient care declines, the health of nurses suffers, and the retention of quality nurses becomes difficult. A new article published in the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, ...

Recommended for you

Religious music brings benefit to seniors' mental health

Apr 18, 2014

A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older Christians, listening to religious music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and increases in life satisfaction, self-e ...

User comments