MRSA skin infections up, linked to furunculosis

MRSA skin infections up, linked to furunculosis
The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the United States is increasing and is associated with follicular infection, most commonly folliculitis followed by furunculosis, according to a review published online July 16 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in the United States is increasing and is associated with follicular infection, most commonly folliculitis followed by furunculosis, according to a review published online July 16 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Keyvan Nouri, M.D., from the University of Miami, and colleagues reviewed the literature for articles on recurrent furunculosis secondary to CA-MRSA.

After excluding articles not referring to Staphylococcus aureus furunculosis from the 1,515 articles initially retrieved, only 91 articles were included in the review. The researchers found that furunculosis has been increasing within the United States secondary to the CA-MRSA epidemic and the resistant organism's close association with the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) virulence factor. PVL-associated follicular infections had the strongest association with furunculosis and its recurrence. The primary risk factor for recurrent furunculosis was the nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, which occurred in 60 percent of individuals.

"The majority of furuncles in the United States are caused by CA-, while elsewhere in the world they are caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers find link to severe Staph infections

Dec 23, 2008

Researchers at The University of Texas School of Public Health recently described studies that support the link between the severity of community-acquired antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA MRSA) infections and th ...

MRSA head and neck infections increase among children

Jan 19, 2009

Rates of antibiotic-resistant head and neck infections increased in pediatric patients nationwide between 2001 and 2006, according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, one of ...

Staph sepsis increases mortality in preterm infants

Mar 12, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Only about 1 percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants develop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, and the morbidity and mortality are similar to that seen i ...

Recommended for you

Fears grow of Ebola spreading to Europe

41 minutes ago

Fears that the west African Ebola outbreak could spread to Europe grew on Wednesday, with the EU allocating extra spending and a leading medical charity warning the epidemic was out of control.

Reducing kidney injury using a quality improvement method

5 hours ago

Using quality improvement measures in eight of the 10 hospitals in the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group, researchers have found a way to reduce kidney injury in patients undergoing a procedure with ...

App for headache sufferers shows success

17 hours ago

A unique app that helps headache sufferers to record the severity and regularity of their pain is being used as part of a Griffith research study.

User comments