Cook Islands plants show regenerative properties

A skin care product based on plants used in traditional Cook Islands remedies has been created by UNSW researchers who are also investigating the regenerative properties of the plants for use in wound and bone healing.

The TeTika cosmetics, developed with the company Cimtech's BioActive Cook Islands oil, incorporates traditional Cook Islands medicines.

TeTika means 'truth and integrity' in Cook Islands Maori.

In 2003, Dr Graham Matheson and UNSW Medicine's Professor Bill Walsh began investigating the regenerative properties of plants in partnership with the local traditional leaders.

Dr Matheson, who has completed a PhD at UNSW based on the project, founded a company that permits traditional owners to share in financial benefits from his research, which has received support from UNSW's commercialisation company, NewSouth Innovations. The company was most recently supported by Australia.

"The University and the traditional leaders and I entered into an agreement that is currently being discussed around the world at biodiversity forums as towards world's best practice in access and benefit sharing," Dr Matheson says.

Dr Matheson and Professor Walsh are now investigating that promote new and skin healing. Professor Walsh says research using the plants is a continued collaborative project.

Dr Matheson and UNSW are major shareholders in the company, Cimtech.

More information: tetika.com.au/

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Water wonder

May 13, 2011

A brilliant water saving idea by UNSW engineering academics Greg Leslie and Bruce Sutton has impressed the judges on ABC TV’s New Inventors program.

Saltwater solution to save crops

Sep 11, 2008

Technology under development at the University of New South Wales could offer new hope to farmers in drought-affected and marginal areas by enabling crops to grow using salty groundwater.

Recommended for you

FDA approves hard-to-abuse narcotic painkiller

7 hours ago

(HealthDay)—A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Race affects opioid selection for cancer pain

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Racial disparities exist in the type of opioid prescribed for cancer pain, according to a study published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FDA approves tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe ...

Tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone approved

9 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe pain when other ...

EU regulator: Morning-after pill OK for all women

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—A commonly used morning-after pill is suitable for use by heavier women, the European Medicines Agency said Thursday after a review of the evidence sparked by the French manufacturer's declaration that the drugs didn't ...

Physicians warned about counterfeit medical devices

Jul 24, 2014

(HealthDay)—Physicians should be aware of the prevalence and serious consequences associated with use of counterfeit medical devices, according to a letter to the editor published online July 20 in Lasers in ...

User comments