Increased stroke risk at 30-days post-CABG versus PCI

Increased stroke risk at 30-days post-CABG versus PCI
The risk of stroke at 30 days is significantly higher in patients who undergo coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass graft surgery compared to those who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention, according to research published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

(HealthDay) -- The risk of stroke at 30 days is significantly higher in patients who undergo coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery compared to those who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Tullio Palmerini, M.D., from Policlinico S. Orsola in Bologna, Italy, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 19 trials that included 10,944 patients who were randomized to CABG or PCI.

The researchers found the 30-day rate of stroke to be significantly increased after CABG compared with PCI (1.20 versus 0.34 percent; odds ratio [OR], 2.94). After a median follow-up of 12.1 months, the results were similar (1.83 versus 0.99 percent; OR, 1.67). The relative increase in the risk of stroke observed with CABG compared with PCI at either 30 days or midterm follow-up was not affected by the extent of coronary artery disease (single vessel versus multivessel versus left main). When the outcomes of 33,980 patients from 27 observational studies were analyzed, the results were also similar.

"Coronary revascularization by CABG compared with PCI is associated with an increased risk of stroke at 30 days and at the midterm follow-up," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

More information: Abstract
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