Reporting of dietary intake methods in obesity trials poor

August 23, 2012
Reporting of dietary intake methods in obesity trials poor
More care needs to be taken in reporting dietary intake methods in childhood and adolescent obesity intervention trials in order to be able to better evaluate and replicate study methods, according to the results of a systematic review published online Aug. 15 in Obesity Reviews.

(HealthDay)—More care needs to be taken in reporting dietary intake methods in childhood and adolescent obesity intervention trials in order to be able to better evaluate and replicate study methods, according to the results of a systematic review published online Aug. 15 in Obesity Reviews.

To evaluate the quality of dietary intake methods and reporting, Tracy Burrows, Ph.D., of the University of Newcastle in Australia, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of 31 studies, including 23 reporting energy intake, 20 reporting macronutrient intakes, and 10 reporting food intake outcomes.

The researchers found the overall quality of methods reporting to be rated as poor in 52 percent of studies, with only three studies rated as excellent. In these studies the most commonly used methods of assessing diet included the food diary (13), 24-hour recall (five), food frequency questionnaire (four), and dietary questionnaire (four). Food frequency questionnaires were rated as being of higher quality than or 24-hour recall.

"Results indicate that authors, reviewers, and journal editors need to ensure more transparent and consistent reporting of dietary methods used in trials if the quality of study reporting is to be improved," the authors write. "In particular, reporting of dietary methods can be improved if investigators provide information on the instrument validity, the qualifications or training of those who administer the dietary assessment, and the food composition database that was used to derive energy and nutrient intakes."

Explore further: High dietary antioxidant intake might cut pancreatic cancer risk

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Monitoring the population's food and supplement intakes

March 8, 2012

Collecting data on what the U.S. population actually consumes is a key nutrition monitoring step. Nutritionists then translate "foods eaten" into "nutrients consumed." This snapshot of the population's food-nutrient intakes ...

How a protein meal tells your brain you are full

July 5, 2012

Feeling full involves more than just the uncomfortable sensation that your waistband is getting tight. Investigators reporting online on July 5th in the Cell Press journal Cell have now mapped out the signals that travel ...

Recommended for you

New target receptor discovered in the fight against obesity

November 25, 2016

The team of scientists from King's College London and Imperial College London tested a high-fat diet, containing a fermentable carbohydrate, and a control diet on mice and looked at the effect on food intake of those with ...

Does where you live affect what you weigh?

November 21, 2016

Adult obesity rates in the United States have reached epidemic proportions, with one in four people considered obese. Yet, obesity rates vary considerably across states and counties.

Skip dinner and maybe boost your metabolism

November 3, 2016

(HealthDay)—Overweight people who eat during a much smaller window of time each day than is typical report fewer hunger swings and burn slightly more fat at certain times during the night, according to a new study.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.