Some drugs are going generic this year and next

By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz

Dozens of brand-name prescription drugs are losing their patent protection, allowing generic versions to enter the market and consumers to save 30 to 80 percent on those medications, said David Belian, director of media relations for the Generic Pharmaceutical Association.

Generic forms of drugs have the same active ingredients as their brand-name counterparts but are significantly cheaper because they don't invest in clinical trials or advertising, Belian said.

About 80 percent of prescriptions are filled with generic drugs, and they have a good track record, said Howard Schiff, executive director of the Maryland Pharmacists Association. But some generic drugs may not work as well as the original brands, so before making the switch consider consulting your doctor who can write a prescription specifying brand-name or generic, Schiff said.

These are the prescription drugs that have been or are expected to be released as generics in 2012 and 2013, according to , which manages pharmacy benefits for employer health plans.

2012: Symbyax (treatment-resistant depression); Geodon (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder); Lexapro (depression, anxiety); Seroquel (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder); Avandia (Type 2 diabetes); Avandamet (Type 2 diabetes); Avandaryl (Type 2 diabetes); Avapro (high blood pressure); Avalide (high blood pressure); Provigil (excessive sleepiness); Plavix (prevents blood clots); Viramune (HIV infection); Lescol/Lescol XL (high cholesterol); Tricor (high cholesterol); Clarinex/Clarinex D (, hives); Singulair (asthma and allergy symptoms); Actos (Type 2 diabetes); Xopenex (asthma, COPD); Revatio (); Diovan/Diovan HCT (high blood pressure); Detrol (); Lidoderm (pain from post-herpetic neuralgia); Atacand/Atacand HCT (); Evoxac (Sjogren's syndrome); Maxalt/Maxalt MLT (migraines); Actoplus Met (Type 2 diabetes).

2013: Opana ER (pain); Zometa (bone complications from cancer); Valcyte (viral infections); Zomig (migraines); Fosamax Plus D (osteoporosis); Rilutek (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis); Temodar (glioblastoma multiforme); Cerezyme (Gaucher disease); Niaspan (high cholesterol); Advicor (); AcipHex (GERD); Vivelle-DOT (menopausal symptoms); Cymbalta (depression, anxiety, nerve/musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia).

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Osiris1
not rated yet Aug 12, 2012
Fosamax will disappear in the wave of lawsuits against its manufacturer. No generic manufacturer in his right mind would ever touch that poison.