Sulfonylureas up cardio events versus metformin

Sulfonylureas up cardio events versus metformin
Use of sulfonylureas for initial treatment of diabetes is associated with increased cardiovascular events and death compared with metformin, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Use of sulfonylureas for initial treatment of diabetes is associated with increased cardiovascular events and death compared with metformin, according to a study published in the Nov. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Christianne L. Roumie, M.D., M.P.H., from the Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System in Nashville, and colleagues conducted a to compare outcomes for 253,690 veterans who initiated metformin (155,025) or sulfonylurea (98,665) therapy for diabetes. The composite outcome consisted of hospitalization for or stroke, or death, adjusting for baseline demographic and medical characteristics.

The researchers found that crude rates for the composite outcome were 18.2 per 1,000 person-years in sulfonylurea users and 10.4 per 1,000 person-years in metformin users (adjusted incidence rate difference, 2.2 more cardiovascular events with sulfonylureas per 1,000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.21). For both glyburide (aHR, 1.26) and glipizide (aHR, 1.15) results were consistent in subgroup analyses and in -matched cohort and sensitivity analyses.

"These observations support the use of metformin for first-line diabetes therapy and strengthen the evidence about the cardiovascular advantages of metformin compared with sulfonylureas," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Popular diabetes meds put to the test

Nov 06, 2012

(HealthDay)—Patients with diabetes who were treated with the popular oral medication metformin face a lower risk of heart attack, stroke or death than those taking sulfonylureas, another common option, ...

Recommended for you

Determine patient preferences by means of conjoint analysis

Jul 29, 2014

The Conjoint Analysis (CA) method is in principle suitable to find out which preferences patients have regarding treatment goals. However, to widely use it in health economic evaluations, some (primarily methodological) issues ...

FDA approves hard-to-abuse narcotic painkiller

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Race affects opioid selection for cancer pain

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Racial disparities exist in the type of opioid prescribed for cancer pain, according to a study published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FDA approves tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe ...

User comments