NHANES data don't support BPA, chronic disease link

NHANES data don't support BPA, chronic disease link
An analysis of data from a public health database has shown no association between urinary bisphenol A levels and chronic diseases, unlike previous studies, but this dataset may be inappropriate to analyze such associations, according to research published online Dec. 5 in PLOS One.

(HealthDay)—An analysis of data from a public health database has shown no association between urinary bisphenol A (BPA) levels and chronic diseases, unlike previous studies, but this dataset may be inappropriate to analyze such associations, according to research published online Dec. 5 in PLOS One.

Judy S. LaKind, Ph.D., from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues analyzed the association between urinary BPA and health outcomes using four datasets (covering 2003 to 2010) from the National Health and (NHANES).

After adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical variables, the researchers found no association between urinary BPA and , heart attack, or diabetes, unlike previous studies that used different criteria and definitions. However, the authors caution that it would be inappropriate to draw conclusions about short-lived environmental chemicals and complex chronic diseases based on analyzing cross-sectional datasets like NHANES.

"We need to expend resources on appropriately designed epidemiologic studies and toxicological explorations to understand whether these types of chemicals play a causal role in chronic diseases," LaKind and colleagues conclude.

One author is a consultant for both industry and government.

More information: Abstract
Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

BPA link to narrowing of the arteries

Aug 15, 2012

A research team from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, and University of Cambridge has for the first time established a link between high levels of urinary Bisphenol-A (BPA) and ...

BPA exposure possibly linked to future heart disease

Feb 29, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Healthy people exposed to higher levels of the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastics, may be more likely to develop heart disease, according to a study published online ...

Recommended for you

Independent safety investigation needed in the NHS

19 minutes ago

The NHS should follow the lead of aviation and other safety-critical industries and establish an independent safety investigation agency, according to a paper published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. The au ...

Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?

4 hours ago

Hoping for sex with two women is common but fantasizing about golden showers is not. That's just one of the findings from a research project that scientifically defines sexual deviation for the first time ever. It was undertaken ...

AMA 'Code of Ethics' offers guidance for physicians

10 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) Code of Ethics and other articles provide guidance for physicians in relation to public health emergencies, according to a report from the AMA.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Dec 12, 2012
"NHANES data don't support BPA, chronic disease link"


More denial from denialists after a consensus has been reached. When will these attacks on science end.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.