How belly fat differs from thigh fat—and why it matters

January 11, 2013

Men tend to store fat in the abdominal area, but don't usually have much in the way of hips or thighs. Women, on the other hand, are more often pear-shaped—storing more fat on their hips and thighs than in the belly. Why are women and men shaped differently? The answer still isn't clear, but it's an issue worth investigating, says Steven R. Smith, M.D., director of the Florida Hospital – Sanford-Burnham Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes. That's because belly fat is associated with higher risks of heart disease and diabetes. On the other hand, hip and thigh fat don't seem to play a special role in these conditions.

In a study published in the Journal of Clinical , Smith and colleagues help explain this discrepancy by determining how belly and thigh fat differ genetically. This research might shift common thinking about fat—rather than focusing on how to banish , perhaps we need tip the balance in favor of heart-friendly fat in the lower body. In that case, the study also provides a first step toward aiming treatments at specific regions of the body, especially those that contribute most to the complications of obesity.

Belly fat genes vs. thigh fat genes

Smith and colleagues first took fat samples from men and women. Then they compared the genes most active in belly fat to those most active in thigh fat.

Here's what they found: The genes operating in a person's thigh fat are hugely different from those in his or her belly fat. For men, 125 genes are expressed differently in the belly than in the thighs. For women, it's 218 genes (most are unique to women, but 59 genes are the same as those that varied in male fat).

The most notable genes that differed are known as homeobox genes. These genes are known for their role in helping shape a developing embryo—determining which cells and organs go where. Many homeobox genes are influenced by hormones such as .

Why are these homeobox genes important for fat? "We believe these actually program those fat cells to respond differently to different hormones and other signals," Smith says.

Stem cells show fat is preprogrammed for its location

In the course of their work, Smith and his team also isolated stem cells from belly and thigh fat and grew them in laboratory dishes. This was a nice control because fat cells in a dish aren't influenced by nerves, hormones, or other outside signals.

Yet the researchers still saw the same location-specific differences in gene activity in the fat that developed from these stem cells. That result told them that the cells are preprogrammed. In other words, belly fat and thigh fat are genetically destined for their final location during development. It's not a difference that's acquired over time, as a result of diet or environmental exposure.

A new way of thinking about fat

Medically speaking, says Smith, it's important to understand these differences and how they arise. "Even though many women hate having large hips and thighs, that pear shape actually reduces their risk of and diabetes. In fact, women who have heart attacks tend to have more belly fat than thigh fat."

This research marks a new way of thinking. "Most people want to stop belly fat. But the problem is not just the fat—it's the location. Belly fat is just a marker of the problem. The real issue is in inability to store that fat on the hips and thighs," he continues.

Smith hopes that future studies aimed at understanding the fundamental differences in these fat depots could lead to specific treatments aimed at the regions that contribute most to the .

Explore further: Staying slim could be in the genes

Related Stories

A new candidate pathway for treating visceral obesity

May 6, 2012

Brown seems to be the color of choice when it comes to the types of fat cells in our bodies. Brown fat expends energy, while its counterpart, white fat stores it. The danger in white fat cells, along with the increased risk ...

Recommended for you

An accessible approach to making a mini-brain

October 1, 2015

If you need a working miniature brain—say for drug testing, to test neural tissue transplants, or to experiment with how stem cells work—a new paper describes how to build one with what the Brown University authors say ...

Tension helps heart cells develop normally in the lab

October 1, 2015

The heart is never quite at rest, and it turns out that even in a lab heart cells need a little of that tension. Without something to pull against, heart cells grown from stem cells in a lab dish fail to develop normally.

Dormant viral genes may awaken to cause ALS

September 30, 2015

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health discovered that reactivation of ancient viral genes embedded in the human genome may cause the destruction of neurons in some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The ...


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Jan 11, 2013
""This was a nice control because fat cells in a dish aren't influenced by nerves, hormones, or other outside signals."

Not exactly true: for in women it is known that fat cells contribute significantly to her body's store of estrogen. This no doubt contributes to propensities for certain cancers (eg, uterine). It also explains why obese women usually experiece far fewer of the discomforting consequences of menapause.
I've no knowledge of how stem-cells might similarly behave,but this issue should be addressed.

1 / 5 (1) Jan 12, 2013
Well, while this fat study may be interesting in and of itself, it seems that its premise has been lately challenged: "UC DAVIS STUDY DEFLATES NOTION THAT PEAR-SHAPED BODIES MORE HEALTHY THAN APPLES" http://www.ucdmc....oom/7365
not rated yet Jan 12, 2013
well the jury is 'still out', and i suspect that will be the case for some time to come ;)

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.