Fatty liver may directly mediate CAD in metabolic syndrome

January 23, 2013
Fatty liver may directly mediate CAD in metabolic syndrome
Men and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome with type 2 diabetes, and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome with subclinical atherosclerosis, according to research published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Men and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome (MetS) with type 2 diabetes, and women with fatty liver are more likely to have MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis, according to research published online Dec. 18 in Diabetes Care.

Juan G. Juárez-Rojas, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City, and colleagues conducted a study involving 765 people (52 percent women) without clinical atherosclerosis to study the role that fatty liver plays in the association of MetS with type 2 diabetes and (CAC). Fatty liver and CAC were determined using computed tomography.

The researchers found that fatty liver increased the association of MetS with type 2 diabetes in both women and men. Women and men with fatty liver were, respectively, 10.6- and 12.1-fold more likely to have MetS with . Additionally, women with fatty liver were 2.34-fold more likely to have MetS with CAC.

"Our study shows that isolated MetS is not independently associated with the presence of CAD. Consistent with findings of other studies, the prevalence of positive CAC was higher in men than in women," the authors write. "However, we found that fatty liver significantly favored the association of MetS with CAC only in women. Therefore, these results support the hypothesis that fatty liver may be not only a marker but even a direct mediator of atherosclerosis in women with MetS."

Explore further: Medical expenses for men with metabolic syndrome higher than those for women, study finds

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Metabolic syndrome linked to arterial stiffness in CKD

June 4, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), those with metabolic syndrome (MetS) have increased arterial stiffness but no increase in endothelial dysfunction, compared to those without MetS, according to ...

Recommended for you

Unique molecular atlas of pancreas produced

September 23, 2016

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. They have also revealed differences in genetic activity between ...

Can long naps cause diabetes?

September 14, 2016

A study presented at a scientific congress Thursday reported a link between long naps and a higher risk of diabetes, though it couldn't say if daytime sleeping was a symptom or a cause.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.