Type 2 diabetes linked to higher risk of stroke and CV problems; metabolic syndrome isn't

June 13, 2011

Among patients who have had an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), type 2 diabetes was associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke or cardiovascular events, but metabolic syndrome was not, according to a report published Online First today by Archives of Neurology.

Previous research has examined the association between cardiovascular incidents and these conditions, according to background information in the article. " is associated with increased risks of both stroke and (CHD)," the authors write. "Metabolic syndrome (MetS) or identifies individuals at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes and is also associated with an increase in stroke and ."

Alfred Callahan, M.D., from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, and colleagues evaluated these risks as part of a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction of (SPARCL) Trial. The primary goal of that study was to evaluate the effect of a cholesterol-lowering statin drug (atorvastatin) on reducing the incidence of stroke in patients with a prior stroke or TIA. For this study, the authors performed a secondary analysis on the data to determine the risk of or cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes or MetS, and whether atorvastatin affected those risks.

In total, the study included 4,731 participants who had experienced an or TIA. When enrollment began, researchers classified 794 individuals as having type 2 diabetes, 642 as having MetS and the remaining 3,295 as having neither condition. The endpoints used for this analysis were recurrence of stroke, major coronary or cardiovascular events, any CHD event and any revascularization procedure (a procedure, such as angioplasty, to open a blocked artery).

Patients with type 2 diabetes were more likely than those in the control group to experience another stroke, major cardiovascular incident, or revascularization procedure. Those in the MetS group were not at increased risk of stroke or major cardiovascular events, but were more likely than those in the control group to undergo revascularization procedures. Treatment with the statin medication did significantly reduce the risk of these events in participants with type 2 diabetes or MetS.

The authors note that their results are similar to other studies of stroke and cardiovascular events in individuals with MetS or type 2 diabetes. In particular, they cite the differences in risks between the two conditions. They also point out that statin use did seem to be protective for participants: "Although the possibility of variation in the benefit of statin treatment in subjects with or without type 2 diabetes or MetS cannot be excluded by this analysis, there was no evidence of a difference in treatment effect."

More information: Arch Neurol. 2011;doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.146

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Mechanism explains how seizures may lead to memory loss

October 16, 2017
Although it's been clear that seizures are linked to memory loss and other cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease, how this happens has been puzzling. In a study published in the journal Nature Medicine, ...

Study shows people find well-being more so from special places than from mementoes

October 16, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers at the University of Surrey has found that people experience a feeling of well-being when thinking about or visiting a place that holds special meaning to them. They also found that ...

New study describes how dopamine tells you it isn't worth the wait

October 16, 2017
How do we know if it was worth the wait in line to get a meal at the new restaurant in town? To do this our brain must be able to signal how good the meal tastes and associate this feeling with the restaurant. This is done ...

A dietary supplement dampens the brain hyperexcitability seen in seizures or epilepsy

October 14, 2017
Seizure disorders—including epilepsy—are associated with pathological hyperexcitability in brain neurons. Unfortunately, there are limited available treatments that can prevent this hyperexcitability. However, University ...

fMRI scans reveal why pain tolerance goes up during female orgasm and shows brain does not turn off

October 13, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers at Rutgers University has determined why women are able to tolerate more pain during the time leading up to and during orgasm. In their paper published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, ...

Neuroscientists identify genetic changes in microglia in a mouse model of neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease

October 13, 2017
Microglia, immune cells that act as the central nervous system's damage sensors, have recently been implicated in Alzheimer's disease.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.