US government to announce new policies for dual use research

February 21, 2013

The U.S. government today released two new documents to guide researchers in carrying out dual use research of concern.

First, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy today published a draft policy for public comment that proposes to formalize the roles and responsibilities of institutions and researchers when they are conducting certain types of research on specific pathogens and toxins. Researchers are often best poised to understand the potential misuse of the information, technologies and products emanating from their research and to propose and implement strategies to mitigate risks.

Second, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today published a framework to guide funding decisions on proposals for research anticipated to generate HPAI (avian influenza) viruses that are transmissible among mammals by respiratory droplets. The new framework outlines a robust review process that takes into account the scientific and public health benefits, the biosafety and risks, and the appropriate risk mitigation measures pertinent to the proposed research.

The HHS is outlined in a Forum that published today in the journal Science.

Explore further: Avian flu breakthrough raises question of potential risk

More information: The Framework document will be available at www.phe.gov/s3/dualuse/Pages/default.aspx
NIH and HHS officials have authored an article in Science that describes the Framework and explains its purpose; that article will be available at www.sciencexpress.org
Information about the general issue of dual use research can be found at: oba.od.nih.gov/biosecurity/biosecurity.html . U.S. Government Policies on dual use research of concern can be found at: www.phe.gov/s3/dualuse/Pages/default.aspx

Related Stories

WHO 'deeply concerned' by mutant bird flu

December 31, 2011

The World Health Organization (WHO) said it was "deeply concerned" about research into whether the H5N1 flu virus could be made more transmissible between humans after mutant strains were produced in labs.

Flu transmission work is urgent: Nature Comment

January 25, 2012

The author of an upcoming Nature paper about H5N1 argues in a Nature Comment article today that research into deadly pathogenic viruses must continue if pandemics are to be prevented. Yoshihiro Kawaoka suggests, after reviewing ...

Researchers weigh in on ethics of H5N1 research

February 9, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- In a commentary on the biosecurity controversy surrounding publication of bird flu research details, a bioethicist and a vaccine expert at Johns Hopkins reaffirm that "all scientists have an affirmative ...

Recommended for you

Older people getting smarter, but not fitter

August 31, 2015

Older populations are scoring better on cognitive tests than people of the same age did in the past —a trend that could be linked to higher education rates and increased use of technology in our daily lives, say IIASA population ...

Higher intelligence score means better physical performance

August 14, 2015

New research reveals a distinct association between male intelligence in early adulthood and their subsequent midlife physical performance. The higher intelligence score, the better physical performance, the study reveals. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.