Rules would make school snacks healthier

by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—The government for the first time is proposing broad new standards to make school snacks healthier, a move that would ban the sale of almost all candy, high-calorie sports drinks and greasy foods on campus.

Under the new rules proposed Friday by the Department of Agriculture, school vending machines that once were full of Skittles and Sprite would instead be selling water, lower-calorie , and baked chips. Lunch rooms that now sell fatty "a la carte" items like mozzarella sticks and nachos would have to transition to healthier pizzas, fruit cups and yogurt.

The rules, required under a child nutrition law passed by Congress in 2010, are an effort to combat childhood obesity. While many schools have already made improvements, others are still selling high-fat, high-calorie foods.

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AlexCoe
1 / 5 (5) Feb 02, 2013
You can lead a horse to water...
More useless regulations from central planning that will fail. If the kids would eat healthy, both in what they eat and how much, they wouldn't have the obesity problems they have now.