Better long-term outcomes with low hep C viral load

Better long-term outcomes with low hep C viral load
In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma, low viral load predicts better long-term surgical outcomes, regardless of the serologic eradication of HCV, according to research published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), low HCV viral load predicts better long-term surgical outcomes, regardless of the serologic eradication of HCV, according to research published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Junichi Shindoh, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Tokyo, and colleagues conducted a study involving 370 patients with HCV-related HCC to determine whether HCV viral load impacts the long-term outcomes of HCC after curative surgical resection.

The researchers found that patients with low viral load had a 23.7 percent higher five-year recurrence-free survival rate than those with a high HCV viral load (36.1 versus 12.4 percent). Low viral load was also associated with an 18.9 percent higher five-year overall survival (76.6 versus 57.7 percent). Patients with a high viral load were 87 percent more likely to develop compared with low viral load patients. The favorable results obtained in low viral load patients were not dependent on serologic eradication of HCV.

"In conclusion, a low viral load may predict lower recurrence and better survival in patients undergoing hepatic resection for HCV-related HCC irrespective of the serologic eradication of HCV," the authors write. "Postoperative antiviral therapy with individually adjusted intensity and incorporation of direct antiviral agents may warrant prospective study to characterize safety and impact on in patients undergoing surgical resection for HCV-associated HCC."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hypoferremia predicts treatment response to IFN-α

Mar 01, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepcidin, a regulator of iron homeostasis, is induced following a single dose of pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFNα), and may be a surrogate marker of immediate ...

New treatment therapy helps inhibit hepatitis C

Jul 31, 2008

Two new studies examine the use of the nucleoside polymerase inhibitor, R1626, to the standard therapy for hepatitis C. The reports appear in the August issue of Hepatology, a journal published by John Wiley & Sons on beh ...

Recommended for you

Ebola kills 31 people in DR Congo: WHO

34 minutes ago

An outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed 31 people and the epidemic remains contained in a remote northwestern region, UN the World Health Organization (WHO) said Tuesday.

Dengue fever strikes models in Japan

3 hours ago

A worsening outbreak of dengue fever in Japan has claimed its first celebrities—two young models sent on assignment to the Tokyo park believed to be its source.

Japanese researchers develop 30-minute Ebola test

3 hours ago

Japanese researchers said Tuesday they had developed a new method to detect the presence of the Ebola virus in 30 minutes, with technology that could allow doctors to quickly diagnose infection.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

15 hours ago

Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.

Cerebral palsy may be hereditary

21 hours ago

Cerebral palsy is a neurological developmental disorder which follows an injury to the immature brain before, during or after birth. The resulting condition affects the child's ability to move and in some ...

User comments