Postpartum anxiety more common than depression

Postpartum anxiety more common than depression
Postpartum anxiety is more common than depression in the days and months following delivery, and is associated with adverse maternal heath outcomes and reduced duration of breastfeeding, according to a study published online March 4 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Postpartum anxiety is more common than depression in the days and months following delivery, and is associated with adverse maternal heath outcomes and reduced duration of breastfeeding, according to a study published online March 4 in Pediatrics.

Ian M. Paul, M.D., from Penn State University in Hershey, and colleagues compared correlates of anxiety with correlates of depression among 1,123 mothers with "well" born ≥34 weeks' gestation. To assess health care use, breastfeeding duration, anxiety, and depression, participants were interviewed in-person during the postpartum stay and by telephone surveys at two weeks, two months, and six months. All participants planned to breastfeed.

The researchers found that, at baseline, 17 percent of participants were positive on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and 6 percent were positive on the Edinburgh Survey (EPDS). There was a significant association between primiparity and a positive STAI (20 versus 15 percent; P = 0.02), but not a positive EPDS (4 versus 7 percent; P = 0.05). Cesarean delivery, reduced duration of breastfeeding, and increased maternal, but not infant, total unplanned health care utilization within two weeks of delivery were all significantly associated with positive STAI scores. At each assessment through six months postpartum, positive STAI scores occurred more frequently than positive EPDS scores.

"Postpartum state anxiety is a common, acute phenomenon during the hospitalization that is associated with increased maternal health care utilization after discharge and reduced duration," write the authors. "State anxiety screening during the postpartum stay could improve these outcomes."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Urinary incontinence doubles risk of postpartum depression

Jun 20, 2011

Women with urinary incontinence after giving birth are almost twice as likely to develop postpartum depression as those without incontinence, according to a new study led by Wendy Sword, a professor in McMaster University's ...

Study: Breastfeeding does not protect against MS relapses

Jul 06, 2011

New research finds breastfeeding doesn't appear to protect against multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses, despite previous studies suggesting there may be a protective role. The research is published in the July 6, 2011, online ...

Recommended for you

Helping babies survive

Nov 21, 2014

A healthy baby is born in the Haydom Lutheran Hospital in Tanzania. She is given the name Precious and her proud mother is ready to take her back to the village. Many children born in the same hospital, or ...

Unstable child care can affect children by age four

Nov 20, 2014

A new study from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) reveals that disruptions in child care negatively affect children's social development as early as age 4. However, the study also ...

Parental involvement still essential in secondary school

Nov 20, 2014

Although students become more independent as they rise through grade levels and parent-teacher interactions typically lessen as students age, parental involvement in a child's education during the secondary ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dailyRx
not rated yet Mar 04, 2013
Postpartum anxiety was also linked to shorter times spent breastfeeding. Fascinating. Read the whole story at dailyrx.com/postpartum-anxiety-more-common-postpartum-depression-among-moms

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.