Diabetes patients need to be consulted to improve treatment

Patients with type 2 diabetes who tailor their own treatment in cooperation with their doctor can reduce their risk of complications such as heart attack with up to 20 percent. This is the result of a new Danish study from the Research Unit for General Practice, University of Copenhagen.

Patients who cooperate with their general practitioner and set for treatment while receiving continuous feedback from their doctor can reduce their risk of complications with up to 20 percent. This is one of the research results of a Danish study just published, "Diabetes care in general Practice".

"It is irrational to treat everybody the same way. We have to put in more effort for some patients than for others, and the have to set personal goals in cooperation with the patients concerning such as blood sugar, blood pressure, and weight" says professor Niels de Fine Olivarius. He is the leading scientist of the study along with doctor Lars J. Hansen.

Changes in lifestyle before medicine

The study " in general Practice" has been running for more than 20 years with 1428 newly diagnosed patients with . 745 general practitioners have followed the patients and half of these general practitioners have received education concerning an improvement of the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes based on the patients' own preferences and changes in lifestyle.

"I think it has been crucial for the success of the study that the doctors have been reluctant to begin medical treatment. In that way, the patients have had the opportunity to experience how much their own efforts such as changes in their food habits, more exercise and weight loss affect their diabetes treatment,"says Niels de Fine Olivarius.

Thus, almost a third of the were able to manage their blood sugar purely by changing their , even 6 years after the diagnosis, and thereby the results also show how important it is with intense care immediately after the patient has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Individual needs

The results have just recently been published in the scientific journal Diabetologia. They show that patients who have received individual care with continuous follow-up have significantly lowered their risk of complications, even though they have not received more medicine than those patients who have received the routine treatment.

At the Research Unit for General Practice the director and professor Susanne Reventlow sees "Diabetic care in general Practice" as a pioneer study regarding new treatment methods for general practice. As an example the results show that it is important to take individual needs into consideration when treating patients who suffer from more than one decease.

More information: link.springer.com/article/10.1… 07/s00125-013-2893-1

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood

Feb 26, 2015

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not ...

CBT, sertraline insufficient in diabetes and depression

Feb 26, 2015

(HealthDay)—For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic ...

Early signs in young children predict type 1 diabetes

Feb 26, 2015

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the ...

Daily menu plan reduces blood sugar significantly

Feb 25, 2015

A large group of people with diabetes who followed a menu plan created by University of Alberta nutrition researchers for just three months significantly reduced their blood sugar levels.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.