Holistic scoring system of obesity treatment outcomes

A new scoring system takes a holistic view of the effect of obesity treatment in patients.

Bariatric surgery is the most successful treatment for obesity. Until now, the measure of has been limited to weight loss and remission of (T2DM) without any reference to the improvement in overall health in the individual patient.

As obesity becomes an ever-more prevalent condition in society today, its impact is evident on many aspects of the wellbeing and health of patients.

A team of researchers led by Conway Fellow, Professor Carel le Roux developed a system to assess nine aspects of the medical, psychological and functional state of a patient after bariatric surgery.

Each aspect is measured in four stages from normal health (stage 0) to advanced disease (stage 3) using quantifiable measures where possible or well-defined categories for qualitative measures.

The team used the new King's Obesity and its modified version to assess a group of 71 Northern Irish patients at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast prior to, and one year after, bariatric surgery at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London.

They found significantly improved outcomes for patients one year after bariatric surgery with fewer patients in the more severe stages of every category. Patients with had similar outcomes to non-diabetic patients.

Not only does this system provide a way to evaluate the effect of obesity interventions in a holistic patient-centred way, it improves on the current scoring system, the Edmonton Obesity Scale, as it is less like to be affected by bias on the part of the assessor.

Speaking at the 2013 British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society meeting in Glasgow, Scotland, , Karl Neff said that the new system is designed to highlight all the benefits bariatric surgery can give to the patient rather than just the physical measurements normally relied on today.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Divorce fuels sugary beverage consumption, study finds

19 hours ago

Children of recently separated or divorced families are likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages than children in families where the parents are married, putting them at higher risk for obesity later in life, according ...

People watching tearjerkers eat 28-55% more

Mar 02, 2015

Sad movies are bad news for diets. A newly reported study from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab showed movie-goers watching tearjerkers ate between 28% and 55% more popcorn both in the lab and in a mall theater ...

Abdominal obesity ups risk of hip fracture

Feb 27, 2015

(HealthDay)—Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Does traffic noise increase the risk of obesity?

Feb 27, 2015

There is an association between road traffic noise and the risk of obesity among people who are particularly sensitive to noise, according to a study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.