Some slightly obese may gain from weight-loss surgery, guidelines say

April 17, 2013
Some slightly obese may gain from weight-loss surgery, guidelines say
Medical groups lower threshold for body-fat levels in new recommendations.

(HealthDay)—Even people who are slightly obese could be candidates for weight-loss surgery under new guidelines released by three U.S. medical groups.

The groups recommended that eligibility for weight-loss (bariatric) surgery be expanded to include mildly to moderately obese people with diabetes or , which is a group of conditions that put people at increased risk for and diabetes.

Under the new rules, eligible patients would have a body-mass index (BMI) of 30 to 34.9. BMI is a measurement of body fat based on height and weight.

There is not enough current evidence, however, to recommend weight-loss surgery for alone, fat lowering alone or reduction alone, independent of BMI criteria, the guidelines said.

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Obesity Society issued the guidelines. They were published in the latest editions of the journals Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, Endocrine Practice and Obesity.

Among the 74 recommendations in the guidelines:

  • Sleeve gastrectomy is reclassified as a proven method of weight-loss surgery, rather than an experimental one.
  • Women should avoid pregnancy before weight-loss surgery and for 12 to 18 months after surgery.
  • A to patient care around the time of surgery is "mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues."
Other recommendations cover topics such as patient screening and selection, deciding on the best type of weight-loss surgery, and criteria for readmitting patients to the hospital after they've had weight-loss surgery.

The previous guidelines were issued in 2008.

"Bariatric or metabolic surgery is among the most studied in medicine and this ever-increasing mountain of evidence continues to show that these procedures are the most successful and durable treatment for obesity and several related diseases," Dr. Daniel Jones, a member of the 12-person panel that developed the guidelines, said in a news release from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.

"However, we've gleaned important new insights, cautions and best practices based on the thousands of studies that were published in medical journals in just the last four years alone and these are reflected in the new guidelines," said Jones, a professor of at Harvard Medical School.

Explore further: Clinical practice guidelines for bariatric surgery are updated

More information: The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about weight-loss surgery.

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radfatty
not rated yet Apr 18, 2013
There are many reasons why weight loss surgery is not the "answer" that people make it out to be, some of which are:
• Bariatric surgery may appear to cure diabetes based on measurements such as fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c, but postprandial glucose may tell a different story, researchers here said [AACE: Bariatric Surgery May Just Mask Diabetes]
• Iron absorption is markedly reduced after RYGBP with no further modifications, at least until 18 mo after surgery. [Iron absorption and iron status are reduced after Roux-enY gastic bypass]
• One study found a significantly higher complication rate over the 6 months after surgery, resulting in costly readmissions and emergency room visits. [Healthcare utilization and outcomes after bariatric surgery]

There is an evidence-based compassionate alternative to bariatric surgery: Health At Every Size®. Please consider this alternative prior to making a decision that will change your entire life, possibly NOT for the better.

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