Integrated model can predict preeclampsia in first trimester

April 4, 2013
Integrated model can predict preeclampsia in first trimester
An integrated model for first-trimester screening of preeclampsia seems effective in a routine care setting, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay)—An integrated model for first-trimester screening of preeclampsia (PE) seems effective in a routine care setting, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Elena Scazzocchio, M.D., from the University of Barcelona in Spain, and colleagues used data from a cohort of 5,170 singleton pregnancies who underwent routine first-trimester screening (2009 to 2011) to examine the effectiveness of an integrated screening test to predict PE. Using maternal characteristics; levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and free β-human chorionic gonadotropin at 8 to 12 weeks; and blood pressure and uterine artery Doppler at 11.0 to 13.6 weeks, a predictive of early- and late-onset PE was constructed.

The researchers found that 2.6 percent of participants developed PE (early PE, 0.5 percent; late PE, 2.1 percent). For early PE, the detection rates were 69.2 percent and 80.8 percent for false-positive rates of 5 and 10 percent, respectively (area under the curve, 0.95). For late PE, the corresponding detection rates were 29.4 and 39.6 percent, respectively (area under the curve, 0.71).

"First-trimester combining maternal factors with uterine artery Doppler, blood pressure, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A is useful to predict PE in a routine care setting," write the authors.
The study was funded by Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Aspirin may prevent DVT and PE in joint replacement patients

February 7, 2012

Following a total joint replacement, anticoagulation (blood thinning) drugs can prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot deep within the extremities, or a pulmonary embolism (PE), a complication that causes a blood ...

Unsuspected PE does not up mortality risk in cancer patients

August 6, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Cancer patients with an unsuspected pulmonary embolism (UPE) do not have an increased mortality risk and have a similar risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) to those with clinically suspected pulmonary ...

Unsuspected PE seldom linked to death in cancer patients

October 9, 2012

(HealthDay)—Unsuspected pulmonary embolism (UPE) is not associated with an increased risk of death in cancer patients when compared to patients without pulmonary embolism (PE), according to research published in the October ...

Recommended for you

Does mom's cellphone startle the fetus?

May 6, 2015

(HealthDay)—The sounds emitted by cellphones carried by pregnant women may rattle the sleep-and-wake cycles of their fetuses, new research suggests.

New IVF device may improve fertility treatment

April 28, 2015

For couples struggling to conceive the old-fashioned way, in vitro fertilization (IVF) provides an alternate route to starting a family. When eggs are mixed with sperm in test tubes, the fertilized eggs to grow into embryos ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.