Two venous punctures not always needed for intravascular ultrasound-guided

April 19, 2013

One venous puncture, rather than two, is a safe and effective approach to intravascular ultrasound-guided inferior vena cava filter placement in critically-ill patients, a new study shows. Inferior vena cava filter placement is done to prevent or treat pulmonary emboli or deep venous thrombosis.

"The majority of institutions use a dual venous puncture technique, while we use a single venous puncture technique," said Dr. Andrew Gunn, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "We were interested to know if the different approaches affected technical success, clinical success or the rate of complications with the procedure," Dr. Gunn said.

In a study of 99 patients, the single puncture technique was technically successful in almost 94% of cases, which is comparable to the dual puncture approach, said Dr. Gunn. The rate for at the venous access site was 2%. This compares to approximately 4% with the double puncture approach, he said.

Dr. Gunn noted that contrast venography is the most common method employed for guiding inferior vena cava filter placement; however, intravascular ultrasound-guided placement is particularly useful in treating critically ill patients, patients who have contrast allergies as well as those who have compromised .

"Intravascular -guided placement can be done at the patient's bedside, eliminating the need for time-consuming and often difficult patient transport," he said. About 41% of the inferior vena cava filter placements were done at the bedside. "The filter was slightly more likely to be malpositioned if the procedure was done at the patient's bedside," Dr. Gunn added.

Dr. Gunn will present his study at the ARRS annual meeting on April 19 in Washington, DC.

Explore further: Cancer patients with blood clots gain no benefit from adding IVCF to fondaparinux

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Zika virus infection alters human and viral RNA

October 20, 2016

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that Zika virus infection leads to modifications of both viral and human genetic material. These modifications—chemical tags known as ...

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn's disease

October 19, 2016

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn's disease later in life, according to a new study led by researchers at McMaster University.

Neurodevelopmental model of Zika may provide rapid answers

October 19, 2016

A newly published study from researchers working in collaboration with the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia demonstrates fetal death and brain damage in early chick embryos similar to microcephaly—a ...

Scientists uncover new facets of Zika-related birth defects

October 17, 2016

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.