Nerve stimulation helps with overactive bladder

May 30, 2013
Nerve stimulation helps with overactive bladder
Electric impulses from a hand-held device travel from the nerves in the ankle to the nerves that control pelvic floor function.

Beaumont Health System research finds that symptoms of overactive bladder, or OAB, were reduced in those who received tibial nerve stimulation. The three-year results published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology show participants with urinary frequency, urgency and involuntary loss of urine maintained significant improvement in their symptoms.

Tibial is a painless procedure that takes place in an outpatient setting. A slim needle is inserted in the ankle, near the tibial nerve. It carries electric impulses from a hand-held stimulator to the nerves in the spinal cord that control function.

Principal investigator Kenneth Peters, M.D., chief of Urology at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak and a team of researchers reviewed data of 29 patients who initially responded to 12 weekly neuromodulation system treatments for OAB. were followed for three years.

Participants received an average of one tibial nerve treatment per month. After 14 weeks of treatment, 77 percent of patients maintained "moderate or marked improvement" in OAB symptoms.

For those who participated in the study, results show frequent trips to the bathroom during the day decreased by nearly 30 percent, or from 12 to 8.7; nighttime trips decreased by almost 40 percent, or from 2.7 to 1.7; and urge incontinence episodes per day decreased by 100 percent.

"This study demonstrates that with ongoing therapy patients with can have fewer symptoms and can return to daily activity without disruption or embarrassment that is often caused by this condition," says Dr. Peters.

According to the Urology Care Foundation, about 33 million Americans – men and women – have OAB. The number of people diagnosed with OAB may be much larger because many people living with this condition don't ask for help; they are embarrassed or unaware of available treatments.

More information: www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(12)05807-7/abstract

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.