Researchers provide prospective on low-dose radiation biology controversy

May 14, 2013

A review of the current issues in low-dose radiation research authored by two radiation biologists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is the cover story of the May 2013 issue of Radiation Research. The review, by Laboratory Fellow Dr. William F. Morgan and retired PNNL scientist Dr. William J. Bair, highlights critical areas of controversy in low-dose radiation biology, and suggests areas of future research to address these issues.

In "Issues in Low Biology: The Controversy Continues. A Perspective," the authors reiterate that exposure to ionizing radiation, both natural and man-made, is a fact of life. The Fukushima disaster in 2011; the debate over the future of nuclear power; and the increasing use of radiation in medicine, agriculture, the military, national security, research, and industry has focused attention on health and safety issues associated with potential exposures to low-dose, low-dose-rate ionizing radiation.

The of the article is interested investigators. However, Morgan and Bair believe it will help government regulators, policy makers, and funding agencies understand why this is a critical time to address concerns associated with low-dose radiation exposures and the nations ability to deal with them in a rational, scientifically based manner.

Explore further: Markers that cause toxic radiotherapy side-effects in prostate cancer identified

More information: Morgan WF and WJ Bair. 2013. Issues in Low Dose Radiation Biology: The Controversy Continues. A Perspective. Radiation Research 179, 501-510. DOI: 10.1667/RR3306.1

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