UN goal to halt spread of AIDS will be met by 2015

June 10, 2013

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says the overall U.N. goal of halting and reversing the spread of AIDS will be met by the target date of 2015.

But the U.N. chief told the General Assembly Monday that despite the "important progress," more must be done to target AIDS in countries and communities where it is still spreading—and this will require additional funds.

"In more than 56 states, we have stabilized the and reversed the rate of new infections," Ban said.

He said more than half the people in low- and middle-income countries are receiving treatment, but antiretroviral therapy must be expanded.

"This is a imperative and a necessity," Ban said.

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