Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID's Catch-22: The paradox of masking and disease

Much research has been done on the effectiveness of masks to mitigate the spread of infectious diseases. However, standard infection models tend to focus only on disease states, overlooking the dynamics of a complex paradox: ...

Medications

Why opting out of opioids can be dangerous in the operating room

Currently, patients in seven states can tell their physicians they don't want to be treated with opioids in any health care setting, even during surgery. While unnecessary opioid exposure is a big reason behind the opioid ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

COVID-19 shown to affect the mental health of pregnant women

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected Canadian women's mental health both during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, confirms the CONCEPTION study led by Anick Bérard, researcher at CHU Sainte-Justine and professor at the ...

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Epidemic

In epidemiology, an epidemic (from Greek epi- upon + demos people) occurs when new cases of a certain disease, in a given human population, and during a given period, substantially exceed what is "expected," based on recent experience (the number of new cases in the population during a specified period of time is called the "incidence rate"). (An epizootic is the analogous circumstance within an animal population.) In recent usages, the disease is not required to be communicable; examples include cancer or heart disease.

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