Higher strength statins do not increase risk of kidney injury

A higher strength of cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins, did not increase the risk of kidney injury among heart attack survivors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Emerging Science Series Webinar.

Statins have been shown to reduce the risk of a first or recurrent heart attack, but recent observational studies suggest that high doses may be linked to a higher incidence of kidney injury. In this study, researchers analyzed data from two large clinical trials in which survivors were randomly assigned to receive either high- or low-dose statins. Higher strenght statins did not increase the risk of hospitalizations with kidney injury when compared to low-dose statins. In addition, concentrations of a , called creatinine, which reflects were comparable between the two groups during follow-up.

"These findings provide important reassurance to clinicians that the use of some high-potency statins will not increase the risk of kidney injury," said Amy Sarma, M.D., M.H.S., the study's lead author and a resident physician in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cholesterol drugs might boost kidney cancer survival

May 07, 2013

(HealthDay)—Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that are taken by millions of Americans might also improve survival from a type of kidney cancer called renal cell carcinoma, a new study suggests.

Recommended for you

'Face time' for the heart diagnoses cardiac disease

8 hours ago

To the careful observer, a person's face has long provided insight into what is going on beneath the surface. Now, with the assistance of a web camera and software algorithms, the face can also reveal whether or not an individual ...

Pay-for-performance not found to impact access to CABG

Aug 27, 2014

(HealthDay)—For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), treatment at pay-for-performance (P4P) hospitals is not associated with a change in the rate of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, ...

User comments