Family history of diabetes increases the risk of prediabetes by 26 percent, with effect most evident in non-obese

August 21, 2013

A study involving more than 8,000 participants has shown that people with a family history of diabetes see their risk of prediabetes increase by 26%. The research is published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and is by Dr Andreas Fritsche and colleagues from the German Center for Diabetes Research.

Prediabetes is a condition most often described as the 'state between control and full diabetes', and indeed prediabetes progresses to full blown diabetes in up to 20% of individuals affected per year.

Prediabetes can take two forms: impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG), whereby levels of glucose in the fast state are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as diabetes; and also impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), where are abnormal due to increased . While it is known that a family history of increases the risk of full blown diabetes, research has not yet explored whether such a family history increases the risk of prediabetes in either form.

In this study Fritsche and colleagues analysed 8,106 non-diabetic individuals of European origin collected from the study centres of the German Center for Diabetes Research.* Of these, 5,482 had normal , and 2,624 had IFG and/or IGT n=2,624. They analysed whether having at least one first degree relative with diabetes is associated with prediabetes.

A family history of diabetes was found to increase the crude, unadjusted risk for prediabetes (IFG and/or IGT) by 40%. This increased risk fell to 26% when the analysis took account of age, sex, and BMI of participants.

When different types of prediabetes were considered, family history increased the risk of isolated IFG by 37%, of isolated IGT by 25%, and the two combined by 64%. However overall, when adjusted for BMI, the association between family history and prediabetes was seen only in non-obese individuals (BMI<30 kg/m2). The authors say: "Our data suggest that a family history of diabetes is associated with prediabetes in non-obese rather than in . This might indicate the effect of family history on prediabetes becomes readily measurable only when not overshadowed by strong risk factors such as obesity."

They conclude: "We found that family history is an important risk factor for prediabetes, especially for combined IGT and IFG. Its relevance seems to be more evident in the non-obese."

Explore further: New NIH fact sheet explains test for diabetes, prediabetes

Related Stories

New NIH fact sheet explains test for diabetes, prediabetes

January 27, 2012

A new fact sheet from the National Institutes of Health explains the A1C test, a widely used and important test to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, and to monitor blood glucose levels of people with type 1 and type ...

Genetic risk score linked to increased risk of diabetes

July 30, 2013

(HealthDay)—A genetic risk score based on 46 gene variants linked to type 2 diabetes is associated with increases in the risk of type 2 diabetes and declines in glucose control and beta-cell function, according to a study ...

Recommended for you

Engineered hot fat implants reduce weight gain in mice

August 20, 2015

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose ...

Bacteria may cause type 2 diabetes

June 1, 2015

Bacteria and viruses have an obvious role in causing infectious diseases, but microbes have also been identified as the surprising cause of other illnesses, including cervical cancer (Human papilloma virus) and stomach ulcers ...

Promising progress for new treatment of type 1 diabetes

July 30, 2015

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports, reveals that administration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.