Employer-based health insurance premiums rose modestly in 2013

Employer-based health insurance premiums rose modestly in 2013
Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose only modestly in 2013, according to research published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

(HealthDay)—Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose only modestly in 2013, according to research published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Gary Claxton, from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in Washington, D.C., and colleagues conducted the annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust Employer Health Benefits Survey of more than 2,000 small and large employers.

The researchers found that, in 2013, single coverage premiums rose 5 percent to $5,884, and family coverage premiums rose 4 percent to $16,351. Fifty-seven percent of firms offered health benefits, a percentage similar to 2012. The percentage of workers covered by their firm's health benefits also remained steady, at 62 percent. There was a significant increase in the share of workers with a deductible for single coverage compared to 2012. The share of workers in small firms with annual deductibles of $1,000 or more also increased significantly compared to 2012. Nearly all large employers and 77 percent of all firms continued to offer wellness programs, although few used incentives to encourage employees to participate. Financial incentives for completing health risk appraisals were used by more than half of large employers offering the appraisals.

"Employer-based health benefits and plan designs were largely unchanged in 2013, as employers and insurers prepared for provisions of the Affordable Care Act to be implemented in 2014," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Premiums expected to be about 20 percent lower in 2014

Jul 23, 2013

(HealthDay)—Premiums in the Health Insurance Marketplace are likely to be about 20 percent lower than anticipated in 2014, according to a report published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ...

US health insurance costs up 9% in year: study

Sep 27, 2011

Company-provided health insurance, one of the largest costs of US businesses and households alike, rose nine percent over the past year despite the sluggish economy, according to a new study released Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

5 hours ago

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

5 hours ago

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

12 hours ago

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments