Ga. autism project looks to early detection

September 21, 2013 by Christina A. Cassidy
Marlaina Dreher, right, sits with her 5-year-old son, Brandon, who is autistic, before a session in the pediatric feeding disorder program at the Marcus Autism Center, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, in Atlanta. A partnership between the Marcus Autism Center, one of the nation's premier autism research centers, and the state of Georgia is working to boost early detection and diagnosis of the disorder. Research shows that 1 in 88 children in the U.S. have autism spectrum disorder, which includes developmental disabilities that affect ability to communicate, understand language and relate to others. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

A partnership between an autism research center and the state of Georgia is working to boost early detection and diagnosis of the disorder.

Research shows that 1 in 88 children in the U.S. have , which includes that affect ability to communicate, understand language and relate to others.

In Georgia, state and contract employees are being trained to work with day care operators and pre-K providers to identify early warning signs and support parents.

Research shows that symptoms can be detected as early as the first two years of life, and early intervention is key.

The center hopes to expand the partnership to other states and is working with the U.S. Department of Education to bring its work to Head Start programs nationwide.

Explore further: Early diagnosis of autism can lead to better treatment

Related Stories

Early diagnosis of autism can lead to better treatment

May 11, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Autism awareness month has come and gone for 2012, but the need for awareness has not. The struggles for families affected by the disorder remain, and the number of those affected continues to rise.

Autism risk spotted at birth in abnormal placentas

April 25, 2013

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have figured out how to measure an infant's risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his/her placenta at birth, allowing for earlier diagnosis and treatment for ...

Autism may be overlooked in young Latino children

August 19, 2013

(HealthDay)—Latino children typically are diagnosed with autism more than two years later than white children, and new research suggests that language-appropriate screenings and access to autism specialists are two big ...

Recommended for you

Researchers identify autism genes using new approach

August 1, 2016

Princeton University and Simons Foundation researchers have developed a machine-learning approach that for the first time analyzes the entire human genome to predict which genes may cause autism spectrum disorder, raising ...

New autism genes are revealed in largest-ever study

September 29, 2015

In the largest, most comprehensive genomic analysis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) conducted to date, an international research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has identified 65 genes that play a role in the disorder, ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

SmarterThanYou
1 / 5 (1) Sep 22, 2013
Top reasons for autism:
1. Older parents.
2. Overweight parents.
3. Bad genes.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.