Health worker roles impacted when 'undervalued' by patients

Health worker roles impacted when 'Undervalued' by patients

(HealthDay)—Job satisfaction among nurse practitioners and other professionals can suffer when clientele lack a clear understanding of what they do, according to research published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Academy of Management Journal.

Michael C. Pratt, from Boston College, studied individuals in four professions and found those professionals, including 13 , often had to educate clients and manage their expectations.

For example, nurse practitioners sometimes experience resistance from patients who insist on being seen by a doctor, despite the fact that the nurse practitioner is qualified to conduct an exam and prescribe medication. These sorts of "image discrepancies" can adversely affect a professional's and even their pay.

"I was surprised at the depth of how this affected job performance. It's not simply annoying—it has real impact," Pratt told HealthDay.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What people don't get about my job

Sep 19, 2013

Having a job is a privilege that brings many things - satisfaction, pride, a roof over your head, a way of life. But what happens when not everyone understands what you do, affecting how they perceive you and how much they ...

2012 primary care incentive payments top 664 million

Aug 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—Payments from the Medicare Primary Care Incentive Payment Program (PCIP) were more than $664 million for calendar year 2012, according to a report published by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid ...

Recommended for you

LA story: Cleaner air, healthier kids

2 hours ago

A 20-year study finds that millennial children in Southern California breathe easier than ones who came of age in the '90s, for a reason as clear as the air in Los Angeles today.

Better midlife fitness may slow brain aging

2 hours ago

People with poor physical fitness in their 40s may have lower brain volumes by the time they hit 60, an indicator of accelerated brain aging, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association EPI/Lifestyle ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.