Well-connected hemispheres of Einstein's brain may have sparked brilliance

by Jeffery Seay
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein

(Medical Xpress)—The left and right hemispheres of Albert Einstein's brain were unusually well connected to each other and may have contributed to his brilliance, according to a new study conducted in part by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk.

"This study, more than any other to date, really gets at the 'inside' of Einstein's ," Falk said. "It provides new information that helps make sense of what is known about the surface of Einstein's brain."

The study, "The Corpus Callosum of Albert Einstein's Brain: Another Clue to His High Intelligence," was published in the journal Brain. Lead author Weiwei Men of East China Normal University's Department of Physics developed a new technique to conduct the study, which is the first to detail Einstein's , the brain's largest bundle of fibers that connects the two cerebral hemispheres and facilitates interhemispheric communication.

"This technique should be of interest to other researchers who study the brain's all-important internal connectivity," Falk said.

Men's technique measures and color-codes the varying thicknesses of subdivisions of the corpus callosum along its length, where nerves cross from one side of the brain to the other. These thicknesses indicate the number of nerves that cross and therefore how "connected" the two sides of the brain are in particular regions, which facilitate different functions depending on where the fibers cross along the length. For example, movement of the hands is represented toward the front and mental arithmetic along the back.

In particular, this new technique permitted registration and comparison of Einstein's measurements with those of two samples—one of 15 elderly men and one of 52 men Einstein's age in 1905. During his so-called "miracle year" at 26 years old, Einstein published four articles that contributed substantially to the foundation of modern physics and changed the world's views about space, time, mass and energy.

The research team's findings show that Einstein had more extensive connections between certain parts of his cerebral hemispheres compared to both younger and older control groups.

The research of Einstein's corpus callosum was initiated by Men, who requested the high-resolution photographs that Falk and other researchers published in 2012 of the inside surfaces of the two halves of Einstein's brain.

More information: brain.oxfordjournals.org/conte… 24/brain.awt252.full

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cantdrive85
1.4 / 5 (7) Oct 04, 2013
This is a trait which can be enhanced, ambidexterity training is one example that increases connections between hemispheres. Not necessarily suggesting just because you juggle you'll be Einstein, but training young minds in such a manner would likely benefit as they age.
Egleton
1 / 5 (5) Oct 04, 2013
Left Brain which creates maps of Reality also houses the Ego and the speech centers. And it is totally unaware of the existence of the Right.
So to the Left the models Are reality and any challenge to the model is perceived as a threat to the very existence of the Ego. Then the full force of the Lefts language abilities and its not inconsiderable powers of Rationalization to defend the models is unleashed.
There was a better balance between Einstein's model making and his gestalt. This is why he often described an Idea as "Beautiful", a very Right brained take on things.

So what to do? Grow a bigger corpus callosum? A colossal callosum, as it were? That is a good long term aim, but in the short term we could weaken the Ego with powerful medication. An over-inflated ego would sit nicely in the DSM alongside ADD.
I would prescribe slow release DMT. The only down-side is that it would cure the patient and that violates all the rules of the pharmaceutical industries' business models.