Dangerous methylmercury levels in sushi

Eating sushi can increase risk of cardiovascular disease. A recent study showed that tuna sashimi contains the highest levels of methylmercury in fish-sushi, based on samples taken from across the USA.

The effects of methylmercury exposure in humans as a result of excessive fish consumption can include neurodevelopmental deficits, poorer cognitive performance and increased rates of .

The study also notes that of methylmercury can be detrimental to the positive effects of , which are known to reduce , reduce the risk of some cancers and incidence of heart disease, blood pressure, stroke, and pre-term delivery.

Over 1,200 people were interviewed about their consumption of sushi and other fish products and mercury levels in sushi samples were analysed from the USA. The study noted that 92% of participants ate an average of 5 fish and fish-sushi meals per month and the top 10% of all participants from across all ethnic groups exceeded the Center for Disease Control Minimal Risk Level and the World Health Organization Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake of methylmercury.

The study further notes that large tuna, such as the Atlantic Bluefin or Bigeye, which are prized for sushi contain the highest mercury levels and that the demand for high-grade tuna for sushi has placed the species into jeopardy by overfishing.

Sushi made with eel, crab, salmon and kelp were found to have lower levels of methymercury.

More information: "Sushi consumption rates and mercury levels in sushi: ethnic and demographic differences in exposure," Joanna Burgerab*, Michael Gochfeldbc, Christian Jeitnerab, Mark Donioab & Taryn Pittfieldab. DOI: 10.1080/13669877.2013.822925

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Record $736k paid for single tuna fish in Japan

Jan 05, 2012

A deep-pocketed restaurateur shelled out nearly three-quarters of a million dollars for a single tuna, the most ever paid for the fish, at Japan's Tsukiji fish market on Thursday.

Warmer oceans could raise mercury levels in fish

Oct 03, 2013

Rising ocean surface temperatures caused by climate change could make fish accumulate more mercury, increasing the health risk to people who eat seafood, Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues report ...

Call for Atlantic tuna quotas to be retained

Nov 11, 2013

A leading environmental group on Monday called on authorities to keep tough fishing quotas on Atlantic tuna when governments meet next week to set industry rules.

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

Oct 24, 2014

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

Oct 24, 2014

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals

Oct 24, 2014

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

tkjtkj
not rated yet Jan 05, 2014
I've not upgraded to your v. 5 yet and am holding off .. but i'd like to know how we 'older version' people can modify the box of blocked sites that appears upon joining a site: it appears in top-right corner,a place where most sites position their 'login' box .. Also, we should be able to define for just how long that list , whereever it's located, continues to exist ..
It seems unnecessarily too long .. and quite inconvenient ..
THanks for considering! Do keep up work on this important app !