Sticker shock often follows insurance cancellation

by Kelli Kennedy

Millions of people across the country are trying to figure out what to do after receiving notices that their individual health insurance policies are being discontinued because they don't meet higher benefit requirements of the federal Affordable Care Act.

They can buy different policies directly from insurers for 2014 or sign up for plans on their state exchange. While lower-income people could see lower costs because of generous government subsidies, many middle-class families and individuals are likely to get a rude awakening when they access the websites and realize they'll have to pay significantly more for .

Those not eligible for subsidies generally will receive more comprehensive coverage than they had under their soon-to-be-canceled policies, but they'll also have to pay a lot more for it.

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