Cancer

Chemo-radiation combo tied to higher survival in peds Hodgkin

(HealthDay)—Combined modality treatment (CMT) is associated with improved overall survival in pediatric patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), according to a study published online Jan. 3 in JAMA Oncology.

Cardiology

Does your insurance card matter when you have a heart attack?

Medicaid reimbursement to health care facilities on ST-elevation myocardial management—or STEMI, a serious form of a heart attack—is often lower when compared with the reimbursement rate of private insurance, according ...

page 1 from 23

Health insurance

Health insurance is insurance that pays for medical expenses. It is sometimes used more broadly to include insurance covering disability or long-term nursing or custodial care needs. It may be provided through a government-sponsored social insurance program, or from private insurance companies. It may be purchased on a group basis (e.g., by a firm to cover its employees) or purchased by individual consumers. In each case, the covered groups or individuals pay premiums or taxes to help protect themselves from high or unexpected healthcare expenses. Similar benefits paying for medical expenses may also be provided through social welfare programs funded by the government.

By estimating the overall risk of healthcare expenses, a routine finance structure (such as a monthly premium or annual tax) can be developed, ensuring that money is available to pay for the healthcare benefits specified in the insurance agreement. The benefit is administered by a central organization such as a government agency, private business, or not-for-profit entity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA