Conn. university to test pot for contaminants

by Dave Collins

The University of New Haven is developing a new process for identifying mold, bacteria and other contaminants in marijuana by using DNA profiling and analysis.

Contaminated pot has become a concern across the country as states work to regulate marijuana. Twenty states and Washington, D.C., now allow the use of , and Washington state and Colorado have legalized recreational pot use.

Some states already have regulations requiring contaminant testing and other states are doing the same, spawning a new marijuana testing industry.

University of New Haven associate professor Heather Miller Coyle says the plan is to develop a new testing process by next summer that would make it easier and quicker for labs across the country to identify contaminants. The method involves developing DNA profiles of .

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